What use is it to us to hear it said of a man that he has thrown off the yoke, that he does not believe there is a God to watch over his actions, that he reckons himself the sole master of his behavior, and that he does not intend to give an account of it to anyone but himself? Does he think that in that way he will have straightway persuaded us to have complete confidence in him, to look to him for consolation, for advice, and for help, in the vicissitudes of life? Do such men think that they have delighted us by telling us that they hold our souls to be nothing but a little wind and smoke — and by saying it in conceited and complacent tones? Is that a thing to say blithely? Is it not rather a thing to say sadly — as if it were the saddest thing in the world?

Blaise Pascal (1623-1662) French scientist and philosopher
Pensées (1670)
Added on 3-Mar-14 | Last updated 3-Mar-14
Link to this post
Topics: ,
More quotes by Pascal, Blaise

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *