No honest, clear-headed man, however great a lover of popular government, can deny that the unbridled expression of the majority of a community converted hastily into law or action would sometimes make a government tyrannical and cruel. Constitutions are checks upon the hasty action of the majority. They are the self-imposed restraints of a whole people upon a majority of them to secure sober action and a respect for the rights of the minority.

William Howard Taft (1857-1930) US President (1909-13) and Chief Justice (1921-1930)
Veto Statement for the Arizona Enabling Act (15 Aug 1911)
    (Source)

Taft vetoed the admission of Arizona to the US with a state constitution that allowed popular recall of judges.
Added on 30-Mar-20 | Last updated 30-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Taft, William

We thus learn that Man is descended from a hairy, tailed quadruped, probably arboreal in its habits, and an inhabitant of the Old World.

Charles Darwin (1809-1882) English naturalist
The Descent of Man, ch. 21 (2nd ed., 1875)
    (Source)
Added on 30-Mar-20 | Last updated 30-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: ,
More quotes by Darwin, Charles

Things never turn out either so well or so badly as they logically ought to do.

William Ralph Inge (1860-1954) English prelate [Dean Inge]
“The Future of the English Race,” Galton Lecture (1919), Outspoken Essays: First Series (1920)
    (Source)
Added on 30-Mar-20 | Last updated 30-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Inge, William Ralph

Do not only look
For gentlefolk in castles: everywhere,
In humble dwellings and in haylofts, too,
The hearts of men are often kind and true.

[Che non pur per cittadi e per castella,
Ma per tuguri ancora e per fenili
Spesso si trovan gli uomini gentili.]

Ludovico Ariosto (1474-1533) Italian poet
Orlando Furioso, Canto 14, st. 62 (1532) [tr. Reynolds (1973)]
    (Source)

Alt. trans.: "For not alone dwells Hospitality / In court and city; but ofttimes we find / In loft and cottage men of gentle kind." [tr. Rose (1831)]
Added on 30-Mar-20 | Last updated 30-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Ariosto, Ludovico

Oh, let it be a night of lyric rain
And singing breezes, when my bell is tolled.
I have so loved the rain that I would hold
Last in my ears its friendly, dim refrain.

Dorothy Parker (1893-1967) American writer
“Testament,” Not So Deep as a Well (1936)
    (Source)
Added on 30-Mar-20 | Last updated 30-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , ,
More quotes by Parker, Dorothy

Life is so sweet! One can die but once, and it is for such a long time!

[Il est si doux de vivre: On ne meurt qu’une fois; et c’est pour si long-tems (longtemps)!]

Molière (1622-1673) French playwright, actor [stage name for Jean-Baptiste Poquelin]
The Love-Tiff [Le Dépit Amoureux], Act 5, sc. 4 (1656) [tr. Van Laun (1875)]
    (Source)

Alt. trans.: "Life is so sweet! We die only once, and for such a long time!" [Lovers' Quarrels, tr. Wall (1879)]

Original French text.
Added on 27-Mar-20 | Last updated 30-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , ,
More quotes by Moliere

One of the sure signs of maturity is the ability to rise to the point of self criticism.

Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929-1968) American clergyman, civil rights leader, orator
“The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness,” Speech, National Urban League, New York (6 Sep 1960)
    (Source)
Added on 27-Mar-20 | Last updated 27-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by King, Martin Luther

However, you do need rules. Driving on the left (or the right or, in parts of Europe, on the left and the right as the mood takes you) is a rule which works, since following it means you’re more likely to reach your intended rather than your final destination.

Terry Pratchett (1948-2015) English author
Post, alt.fan.pratchett (20 Jun 2002)
    (Source)
Added on 27-Mar-20 | Last updated 27-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: ,
More quotes by Pratchett, Terry

Ye knowe ek that, in forme of speche is chaunge
Withinne a thowsand yere, and words tho
That hadden prys, now wonder nyce and straunge
Us thynketh hem, and yet thai spake hm so,
And spedde as wele in love, as men now do ….

[You know that the form of speech will change within a thousand years, and words that were once apt, we now regard as quaint and strange; and yet they spoke them thus, and succeeded as well in love as men do now.]

Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1343-1400) English poet, philosopher, astronomer, diplomat
Troilus and Criseyde, Book 2, st. 4, ll. 22-26 (1385)
    (Source)

Note that the spelling varied between different editions of this same text.

Alt. trans.:
"Remember in the forms of speech comes change
Within a thousand years, and words that then
Were well esteemed, seem foolish now and strange;
And yet they spake them so, time and again,
And thrived in love as well as any men." [tr. Krapp (2006)]
Added on 24-Mar-20 | Last updated 24-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Chaucer, Geoffrey

For a man of sensitivity and compassion to exercise great powers in a time of crisis is a grim and agonizing thing.

Richard Hofstadter (1916-1970) American historian and intellectual
The American Political Tradition: And the Men Who Made It, Part 5, ch. 7 (1958)
    (Source)

Referring to Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War.
Added on 24-Mar-20 | Last updated 24-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Hofstadter, Richard

Today we give our thanks, most of all, for the ideals of honor and faith we inherit from our forefathers — for the decency of purpose, steadfastness of resolve and strength of will, for the courage and the humility, which they possessed and which we must seek every day to emulate. As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words but to live by them.

John F. Kennedy (1917-1963) US President (1961-63)
Thanksgiving Day Proclamation (4 Nov 1963)
    (Source)

The 1963 Proclamation was written, finalized, and distributed prior to Kennedy's assassination, six days before Thanksgiving.
Added on 24-Mar-20 | Last updated 24-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Kennedy, John F.

Against all appearances the nature of things works for truth and right forever.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) American essayist, lecturer, poet
“The Conduct of Life” (1860)
    (Source)
Added on 24-Mar-20 | Last updated 24-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Emerson, Ralph Waldo

Every word is a messenger. Some have wings; some are filled with fire; some are filled with death.

Mary Oliver (1935-2019) American poet
“Sand Dabs, Six,” Winter Hours (1999)
    (Source)
Added on 24-Mar-20 | Last updated 24-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , ,
More quotes by Oliver, Mary

There is no possibility of being witty without a little ill-nature; the malice in a good thing is the barb that makes it stick.

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751-1816) Irish dramatist, satirist, politician
The School for Scandal, Act 1 (1777)
    (Source)
Added on 23-Mar-20 | Last updated 23-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Sheridan, Richard Brinsley

Men resemble great deserted palaces: the owner occupies only a few rooms and has closed-off wings where he never ventures.

François Mauriac (1885-1970) French author, critic, journalist
Second Thoughts: Reflections on Literature and on Life (1961)
Added on 23-Mar-20 | Last updated 23-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , ,
More quotes by Mauriac, Francois

Race and nationality are catchwords for which rulers find that their subjects are willing to fight, as they fought for what they called religion four hundred years ago.

William Ralph Inge (1860-1954) English prelate [Dean Inge]
“The Future of the English Race,” Galton Lecture (1919), Outspoken Essays: First Series (1920)
    (Source)
Added on 23-Mar-20 | Last updated 23-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Inge, William Ralph

What a man sees, Love can make invisible —
And what is invisible, that can Love make him see.

[Quel che l’huom vede Amor gli fa invisibile
E l’invisibil fa vedere Amore.]

Ludovico Ariosto (1474-1533) Italian poet
Orlando Furioso, Canto 1, st. 56 [ll. 396-97] (1532) [tr. Waldman]

Alt. trans.:
  • "Love, what we can see, can from our sight remove, / And things invisible are seen by Love." [tr. Hoole (1807)]
  • "Since love, who sees without one guiding gleam, / Spies in broad day but that which likes him best." [tr. Rose (1831)]
Added on 23-Mar-20 | Last updated 30-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Ariosto, Ludovico

Four be the things I am wiser to know:
Idleness, sorrow, a friend, and a foe.

Four be the things I’d been better without:
Love, curiosity, freckles, and doubt.

Three be the things I shall never attain:
Envy, content, and sufficient champagne.

Three be the things I shall have till I die:
Laughter and hope and a sock in the eye.

Dorothy Parker (1893-1967) American writer
“Inventory,” Enough Rope (1926)
    (Source)
Added on 23-Mar-20 | Last updated 23-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Parker, Dorothy

The very act of trying to run counter to the culture is what creates the next wave of culture people will in turn attempt to counter.

David McRaney (contemp.) American journalist, author, new media worker
You Are Not So Smart, ch. 27 “Selling Out” (2011)
    (Source)
Added on 20-Mar-20 | Last updated 20-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , ,
More quotes by McRaney, David

When the eagles are silent, the parrots begin to jabber.

Winston Churchill (1874-1965) British statesman and author
Comment (16 May 1945)
    (Source)

Churchill used this phrase on multiple occasions over the years. This one, quoted by Field Marshal Alan Brooke, War Diaries (2001), was directed at the post-war complaints of Tito and DeGaulle.
Added on 20-Mar-20 | Last updated 20-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , ,
More quotes by Churchill, Winston

But if physical death is the price that a man must pay to free his children and his white brethren from a permanent death of the spirit, then nothing could be more redemptive. This is the type of soul force that I am convinced will triumph over the physical force of the oppressor.

Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929-1968) American clergyman, civil rights leader, orator
“The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness,” Speech, National Urban League, New York (6 Sep 1960)
    (Source)
Added on 20-Mar-20 | Last updated 20-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by King, Martin Luther

I think perhaps the most important problem is that we are trying to understand the fundamental workings of the universe via a language devised for telling one another when the best fruit is.

Terry Pratchett (1948-2015) English author
Post, alt.fan.pratchett (16 Apr 2002)
    (Source)
Added on 20-Mar-20 | Last updated 20-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Pratchett, Terry

TANNER: The true artist will let his wife starve, his children go barefoot, his mother drudge for his living at seventy, sooner than work at anything but his art.

George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) British playwright and critic
Man and Superman, Act 1 (1903)
    (Source)
Added on 19-Mar-20 | Last updated 19-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Shaw, George Bernard

Feminism: The radical notion that women are people.

Marie Shear (1940-2017) American writer and feminist activist
“Media Watch: Celebrating Women’s Words,” New Directions for Women (May/Jun 1986)
    (Source)

Often misattributed to Cheris Kramarae and Paula Treichler, A Feminist Dictionary (1985), which was the subject of Shear's review.
Added on 19-Mar-20 | Last updated 19-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , ,
More quotes by Shear, Marie

The barbarous custom of having men beaten who are suspected of having important secrets to reveal must be abolished. It has always been recognized that this way of interrogating men, by putting them to torture, produces nothing worthwhile. The poor wretches say anything that comes into their mind and what they think the interrogator wishes to know.

Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821) French emperor, military leader
Letter to Louis Alexandre Berthier (11 Nov 1798), in Correspondence Napoleon, Vol 5, #3605 [ed. Henri Plon (1861)]
    (Source)
Added on 19-Mar-20 | Last updated 19-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , ,
More quotes by Napoleon Bonaparte

The world is not respectable; it is mortal, tormented, confused, deluded forever; but it is shot through with beauty, with love, with glints of courage and laughter; and in these, the spirit blooms timidly, and struggles to be a light amid the thorns.

George Santayana (1863-1952) Spanish-American poet and philosopher [Jorge Agustín Nicolás Ruíz de Santayana y Borrás]
Platonism and the Spiritual Life (1927)
    (Source)
Added on 19-Mar-20 | Last updated 19-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Santayana, George

One must not always think that feeling is everything. Art is nothing without form.

Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880) French writer, novelist
Letter to Louise Colet (12 Aug 1846)
    (Source)
Added on 19-Mar-20 | Last updated 19-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Flaubert, Gustave

No sooner said than done — so acts your man of worth.

[Dictum factumque facit frux.]

Quintus Ennius (239-169 BC) Roman poet, writer
Fragment 315 [tr. Warmington]
    (Source)

Quoted in Priscianus, Ars Prisciani, Book 6.
Added on 19-Mar-20 | Last updated 19-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , ,
More quotes by Ennius

A slander iz like a hornet, if you kant kill it dead the fus blo, you better not strike at it.

[A slander is like a hornet, if you can’t kill it dead the first blow, you better not strike at it.]

Josh Billings (1818-1885) American humorist [pseud. of Henry Wheeler Shaw]
Everybody’s Friend, Or; Josh Billing’s Encyclopedia and Proverbial Philosophy of Wit and Humor, “Lobstir Sallad” (1874)
    (Source)
Added on 19-Mar-20 | Last updated 19-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , ,
More quotes by Billings, Josh

I carry you with me into the world, into the smell of rain & the words that dance between people
& for me, it will always be this way,
walking in the light,
remembering being alive together

Brian Andreas (b. 1956) American writer, artist, publisher [birth and pen name of Kai Andreas Skye]
“Living Memory,” StoryPeople
Added on 18-Mar-20 | Last updated 18-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , ,
More quotes by Andreas, Brian

Architecture is inhabited sculpture.

Other Authors and Sources
Constantin Brâncuși (1876-1957) Romanian sculptor, painter, photographer

Quoted in Igor Stravinsky and Robert Craft, Themes and Episodes (1966).
Added on 18-Mar-20 | Last updated 18-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: ,
More quotes by ~Other

We are willing enough to praise freedom when she is safely tucked away in the past and cannot be a nuisance. In the present, amidst dangers whose outcome we cannot foresee, we get nervous about her, and admit censorship.

E. M. Forster (1879-1970) English novelist, essayist, critic, librettist [Edward Morgan Forster]
“The Tercentenary of the Areopagitica,” Two Cheers for Democracy (1951)
    (Source)
Added on 18-Mar-20 | Last updated 20-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Forster, E. M.

DICAEPOLIS: Comedy too can sometimes discern what is right. I shall not please, but I shall say what is true.

Aristophanes (c.450-c.388 BC) Athenian comedic playwright
Acharnians, ll. 500-501 (425 BC) [tr. Athenian Society (1912)]
    (Source)
Added on 18-Mar-20 | Last updated 18-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , ,
More quotes by Aristophanes

One looks back with appreciation to the brilliant teachers, but with gratitude to those who touched our human feelings. The curriculum is so much necessary raw material, but warmth is the vital element for the growing plant and for the soul of the child.

Carl Jung (1875-1961) Swiss psychologist
“The Gifted Child” (1942), The Development of Personality, sec. 250 (1954) [tr. Hull]
    (Source)

Translated from "Der Begabte," Psychologie und Erziehung (1946).
Added on 17-Mar-20 | Last updated 17-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Jung, Carl

A great part of courage is the courage of having done the thing before.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) American essayist, lecturer, poet
The Conduct of Life, ch. 4 “Culture” (1860)
    (Source)
Added on 17-Mar-20 | Last updated 17-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Emerson, Ralph Waldo

You can have the other words — chance, luck, coincidence, serendipity. I’ll take grace. I don’t know what it is exactly, but I’ll take it.

Mary Oliver (1935-2019) American poet
“Sand Dabs, Five,” Winter Hours (1999)
    (Source)
Added on 17-Mar-20 | Last updated 20-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Oliver, Mary

To array a man’s will against his sickness is the supreme art of medicine.

Henry Ward Beecher (1813-1887) American clergyman and orator
Norwood; or, Village Life in New England, Vol. 1, ch. 6 (1867)
    (Source)
Added on 16-Mar-20 | Last updated 16-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Beecher, Henry Ward

Malice is of a low Stature, but it hath very long Arms.

George Savile, Marquis of Halifax (1633-1695) English politician and essayist
“Of Malice and Envy,” Political, Moral, and Miscellaneous Thoughts and Reflections (1750)
    (Source)
Added on 16-Mar-20 | Last updated 16-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , ,
More quotes by Halifax, George Savile, Marquis of

Just for the record, darling, not all positive change feels positive in the beginning.

Other Authors and Sources
S. C. Lourie
Added on 16-Mar-20 | Last updated 16-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by ~Other

It is worse than useless to try to put down by law a practice which a very large number of people believes to be innocent, and which must be left to the taste and conscience of the individual.

William Ralph Inge (1860-1954) English prelate [Dean Inge]
“The Birth-Rate” (1917), Outspoken Essays: First Series (1919)
    (Source)

Speaking of birth control.
Added on 16-Mar-20 | Last updated 16-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Inge, William Ralph

For when the water is up to your neck you must be truly stubborn not to cry for help.

[Che chi ne l’acqua sta fin’alla gola
Ben’e ostinato se merce non grida.]

Ludovico Ariosto (1474-1533) Italian poet
Orlando Furioso, Canto 1, st. 50, l. 353 (1532) [tr. Waldman]

Alt. trans.:
  • "For who, when circling waters round him spread / And menace present death, impores not aid?" [tr. Hoole (1807)]
  • "For the poor drowning caitiff, who, chin-deep, / Implores not help, is obstinate indeed." [tr. Rose (1831)]
  • "The drowning man who waits to be exhorted / To cry for help must be a man of pride!" [tr. Reynolds (2006)]
Added on 16-Mar-20 | Last updated 16-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Ariosto, Ludovico

I hate writing. I love having written.

Dorothy Parker (1893-1967) American writer
(Attributed)
Added on 16-Mar-20 | Last updated 16-Mar-20
Link to this post | 1 comment
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Parker, Dorothy

My definition of Man is “a Cooking animal.” The beasts have memory, judgment, and all the faculties and passions of our mind, in a certain degree; but no beast is a cook. … Man alone can dress a good dish; and every man whatever is more or less a cook, in seasoning what he himself eats.

James Boswell (1740-1795) Scottish biographer, diarist, lawyer
The Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson, Sunday, 15 Aug, footnote (1785)
    (Source)

Unlike most quoted Boswell, this is his own thought, not that of Samuel Johnson, recounting a conversation he had with Edmund Burke.
Added on 16-Mar-20 | Last updated 16-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Boswell, James

Making money ain’t nothing exciting to me. … You might be able to buy a little better booze than some wino on the corner. But you get sick just like the next cat, and when you die you’re just as graveyard dead as he is.

Louis "Satchmo" Armstrong (1900-1971) American musician
Ebony (Nov 1964)
    (Source)
Added on 13-Mar-20 | Last updated 13-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Armstrong, Louis

A guy walks up to me and asks “What’s Punk?”
So I kick over a garbage can and say “That’s Punk!”
So he kicks over the garbage can and says “That’s Punk?”
And I say “No that’s trendy!”

Billie Joe Armstrong (b. 1972) American singer, songwriter, musician
In Matt Doeden, Green Day: Keeping Their Edge‎ (2006)
    (Source)
Added on 13-Mar-20 | Last updated 13-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Armstrong, Billie Joe

I had time after time watched the progression across the plain of the Giraffe, in their queer, inimitable, vegetative gracefulness, as if it were not a herd of animals but a family of rare, long-stemmed, speckled gigantic flowers slowly advancing.

Isak Dinesen (1885-1962) Danish writer [pseud. of Karen Christence, Countess Blixen]
Out of Africa, Part 1 (1937)
    (Source)
Added on 13-Mar-20 | Last updated 13-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , ,
More quotes by Dinesen, Isak

Satchelmouth was by no means averse to the finger-foxtrot and the skull fandango, but he’d never murdered anyone, at least on purpose. Satchelmouth had been made aware that he had a soul and, though it had a few holes in it and was a little ragged around the edges, he cherished the hope that some day the god Reg would find him a place in a celestial combo. You didn’t get the best gigs if you were a murderer. You probably had to play the viola.

Terry Pratchett (1948-2015) English author
Soul Music (1994)
Added on 13-Mar-20 | Last updated 13-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Pratchett, Terry

Every fool is fully convinced, and every one fully persuaded is a fool: the more erroneous his judgment, the more firmly he holds it.

Baltasar Gracián y Morales (1601-1658) Spanish Jesuit priest, writer, philosopher
The Art of Worldly Wisdom [Oráculo Manual y Arte de Prudencia], #183 (1647) [tr. Jacobs (1892)]
    (Source)
Added on 13-Mar-20 | Last updated 13-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Gracián, Baltasar

No man holding a strong belief on one side of a question, or even wishing to hold a belief on one side, can investigate it with such fairness and completeness as if he were really in doubt and unbiased; so that the existence of a belief not founded on fair inquiry unfits a man for the performance of this necessary duty.

William Kingdon Clifford (1845-1879) English mathematician and philosopher
“The Ethics of Belief,” Part 1 “The Duty of Inquiry,” Contemporary Review (Jan 1877)
    (Source)
Added on 13-Mar-20 | Last updated 13-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Clifford, William Kingdon

I couldn’t get myself to read the want ads. The thought of sitting in front of a man behind a desk and telling him that I wanted a job, that I was qualified for a job, was too much for me. Frankly, I was horrified by life, at what a man had to do simply in order to eat, sleep, and keep himself clothed.

Charles Bukowski (1920-1994) German-American author, poet
Factotum, ch. 31 (1975)
Added on 13-Mar-20 | Last updated 13-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Bukowski, Charles

“Snowflake.” Yes, I’ve heard this word. I think sociopaths use it in an attempt to discredit the notion of empathy.

John Cleese (b. 1939) English comedian, actor, screenwriter, producer
Twitter (8 Jul 2018)
    (Source)
Added on 12-Mar-20 | Last updated 12-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Cleese, John

In art as in lovemaking, heartfelt ineptitude has its appeal and so does heartless skill, but what you want is passionate virtuosity.

John Barth (b. 1930) American writer
Quoted in Charles B. Harris, Passionate Virtuosity: The Fiction of John Barth (1983)
    (Source)

Quoted as such in the introductory materials, without specific citation. Barth used the phrase on multiple occasions, including:
  • "My feeling about technique in art is that it has about the same value as technique in love-making. That is to say, on the one hand, heartfelt ineptitude has its appeal and, on the other hand, so does heartless skill; but what you want is passionate virtuosity." [first used, in Alan Prince, "An Interview with John Barth," Prism (Spring 1968)]
  • "Heartfelt ineptitude has its appeal, Dunyazade; so does heartless skill. But what you want is passionate virtuosity." [Barth, Chimera (1972)]
Added on 12-Mar-20 | Last updated 12-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Barth, John

Home is in every sentence of your writing.

Maya Angelou (1928-2014) American poet, memoirist, activist [b. Marguerite Ann Johnson]
“The Art of Fiction,” Paris Review, #116, Interview with George Plimpton (1990)
    (Source)
Added on 12-Mar-20 | Last updated 12-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Angelou, Maya

There is no “True.” There are only ways of perceiving.

Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880) French writer, novelist
Letter to Léon Hennique (3 Feb 1880) [tr. Steegmuller (1982)]
    (Source)
Added on 12-Mar-20 | Last updated 12-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Flaubert, Gustave

He who has conquered is not conqueror
Unless the conquered one confesses it.

[Qui vincit non est victor nisi victus fatetur.]

Quintus Ennius (239-169 BC) Roman poet, writer
Annales, Fragment 485
    (Source)

Quoted by Marcus Servius Honoratus, Commentaries on the Poems of Virgil [In Vergilii Carmina Comentarii], Book 11. Alt. trans.:
  • "He who conquers is not the conqueror unless the conquered admits it." [Source, 493 (Vahlen)]
  • "He who conquers is no conqueror unless the conquered admits it." [Source, 513]
  • "The victor is not victorious if the vanquished does not consider himself so." [Source]
Added on 12-Mar-20 | Last updated 12-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Ennius