Quotations by:
    Austen, Jane


But for my own part, if a book is well written, I always find it too short.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
“Catharine” [Kitty] (1792)
    (Source)
 
Added on 9-Apr-24 | Last updated 9-Apr-24
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

I lay it down as a general rule, Harriet, that if a woman doubts as to whether she should accept a man or not, she certainly ought to refuse him. If she can hesitate as to ‘Yes,’ she ought to say ‘No’ directly.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Emma, Vol. 1, ch. 7 [Emma] (1816)
    (Source)
 
Added on 26-Mar-24 | Last updated 26-Mar-24
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

It is always incomprehensible to a man that a woman should ever refuse an offer of marriage. A man always imagines a woman to be ready for any body who asks her.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Emma, Vol. 1, ch. 8 [Emma] (1816)
    (Source)
 
Added on 15-Jun-23 | Last updated 15-Jun-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of the other.

Austen - One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of the other - wist.info quote

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Emma, Vol. 1, ch. 9 [Emma] (1816)
    (Source)
 
Added on 1-Feb-04 | Last updated 22-Jun-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

Surprises are foolish things. The pleasure is not enhanced, and the inconvenience is often considerable.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Emma, Vol. 2, ch. 8 (ch. 26) [Mr. Knightley] (1816)
    (Source)
 
Added on 26-Apr-10 | Last updated 3-Aug-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

Why did we wait for any thing? — why not seize the pleasure at once? — How often is happiness destroyed by preparation, foolish preparation!

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Emma, Vol. 2, ch. 12 (ch. 30) [Frank Churchill] (1816)
    (Source)
 
Added on 17-Oct-05 | Last updated 3-Aug-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

Ah! there is nothing like staying at home for real comfort.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Emma, Vol. 2, ch. 14 (ch. 32) [Mrs. Elton] (1816)
    (Source)
 
Added on 19-Apr-10 | Last updated 3-Aug-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

A vast deal may be done by those who dare to act.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Emma, Vol. 2, ch. 15 (ch. 33) [Mrs. Elton] (1816)
    (Source)
 
Added on 29-Jun-23 | Last updated 3-Aug-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

One cannot have too large a party. A large party secures its own amusement.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Emma, Vol. 3, ch. 6 (ch. 42) [Mr. Weston] (1816)
    (Source)
 
Added on 13-Jul-23 | Last updated 3-Aug-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

What could I do! Facts are such horrid things!

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Lady Susan, Letter 32 “Mrs. Johnson to Lady Susan” (1794, pub 1871)
    (Source)
 
Added on 8-Jun-23 | Last updated 8-Jun-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

I pay very little regard to what any young person says on the subject of marriage. If they profess a disinclination for it, I only set it down that they have not yet seen the right person.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Mansfield Park, ch. 4 [Mrs. Grant] (1814)
    (Source)
 
Added on 27-Apr-23 | Last updated 27-Apr-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

Depend upon it, you see but half. You see the evil [of matrimony], but you do not see the consolation. There will be little rubs and disappointments everywhere, and we are all apt to expect too much; but then, if one scheme of happiness fails, human nature turns to another; if the first calculation is wrong, we make a second better: we find comfort somewhere — and those evil-minded observers, dearest Mary, who make much of a little, are more taken in and deceived than the parties themselves.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Mansfield Park, ch. 5 [Henry Crawford to Mary] (1814)
    (Source)
 
Added on 21-Mar-23 | Last updated 21-Mar-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

Of various admirals I could tell you a great deal: of them and their flags, and the gradation of their pay, and their bickerings and jealousies. But, in general, I can assure you that they are all passed over, and all very ill used. Certainly, my home at my uncle’s brought me acquainted with a circle of admirals. Of Rears and Vices I saw enough. Now, do not be suspecting me of a pun, I entreat.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Mansfield Park, ch. 6 [Fanny Price] (1814)
    (Source)
 
Added on 13-Jan-23 | Last updated 13-Jan-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

Selfishness must always be forgiven, you know, because there is no hope of a cure.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Mansfield Park, ch. 7 [Mary Crawford] (1814)
    (Source)
 
Added on 4-May-23 | Last updated 4-May-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

It will, I believe, be everywhere found, that as the clergy are, or are not what they ought to be, so are the rest of the nation.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Mansfield Park, ch. 9 [Edmund Bertram] (1814)
    (Source)
 
Added on 12-Apr-10 | Last updated 10-Nov-22
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

I speak what appears to me the general opinion; and where an opinion is general, it is usually correct.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Mansfield Park, ch. 11 [Mary Crawford] (1814)
    (Source)
 
Added on 10-Oct-22 | Last updated 10-Oct-22
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

I cannot think well of a man who sports with any woman’s feelings; and there may often be a great deal more suffered than a stander-by can judge of.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Mansfield Park, ch. 36 [Fanny Price] (1814)
    (Source)
 
Added on 13-Apr-23 | Last updated 13-Apr-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

There is nothing like employment, active indispensable employment, for relieving sorrow. Employment, even melancholy, may dispel melancholy, and her occupations were hopeful.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Mansfield Park, ch. 46 (1814)
    (Source)
 
Added on 11-May-23 | Last updated 11-May-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

She was of course only too good for him; but as nobody minds having what is too good for them, he was very steadily earnest in the pursuit of the blessing.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Mansfield Park, ch. 48 (1814)
    (Source)
 
Added on 24-Oct-22 | Last updated 24-Oct-22
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel must be intolerably stupid.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Northanger Abbey, ch. 14 [Henry Tiney] (1817)
    (Source)
 
Added on 25-May-23 | Last updated 25-May-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

My idea of good company, Mr. Elliot, is the company of clever, well-informed people, who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Persuasion, ch. 16 [Anne] (1818)
    (Source)
 
Added on 28-Feb-22 | Last updated 28-Feb-22
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife. However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on his first entering a neighbourhood, this truth is so well fixed in the minds of the surrounding families, that he is considered the rightful property of some one or other of their daughters.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Pride and Prejudice, ch. 1, Opening Lines (1813)
    (Source)
 
Added on 11-Oct-23 | Last updated 11-Oct-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

Nothing is more deceitful than the appearance of humility. It is often only carelessness of opinion, and sometimes an indirect boast.‬

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Pride and Prejudice, ch. 10 [Darcy] (1813)
    (Source)
 
Added on 1-Jun-20 | Last updated 27-Feb-24
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

“What think you of books?” said he, smiling.
“Books — oh! no. I am sure we never read the same, or not with the same feelings.”
“I am sorry you think so; but if that be the case, there can at least be no want of subject. We may compare our different opinions.”

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Pride and Prejudice, ch. 18 [Darcy and Elizabeth] (1813)
    (Source)
 
Added on 29-Nov-23 | Last updated 29-Nov-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

We are of each an unsocial, taciturn disposition, unwilling to speak, unless we expect to say something that will amaze the whole room, and be handed down to posterity with all of the eclat of a proverb.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Pride and Prejudice, ch. 18 [Elizabeth] (1813)
    (Source)
 
Added on 9-Nov-23 | Last updated 9-Nov-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

It is particularly incumbent on those who never change their opinion, to be secure of judging properly at first.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Pride and Prejudice, ch. 18 [Elizabeth] (1813)
    (Source)
 
Added on 7-Dec-23 | Last updated 7-Dec-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

People who suffer as I do from nervous complaints can have no great inclination for talking. Nobody can tell what I suffer! — But it is always so. Those who do not complain are never pitied.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Pride and Prejudice, ch. 20 [Mrs. Bennet] (1813)
    (Source)
 
Added on 8-Feb-13 | Last updated 14-Sep-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Pride and Prejudice, ch. 24 [Elizabeth] (1813)
    (Source)
 
Added on 28-Sep-23 | Last updated 28-Sep-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

Importance may be sometimes purchased too dearly.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Pride and Prejudice, ch. 26 [Elizabeth] (1813)
    (Source)
 
Added on 12-Dec-23 | Last updated 12-Dec-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

“I certainly have not the talent which some people possess,” said Darcy, “of conversing easily with those I have never seen before. I cannot catch their tone of conversation, or appear interested in their concerns, as I often see done.”
“My fingers,” said Elizabeth, “do not move over this instrument in the masterly manner which I see so many women’s do. They have not the same force or rapidity, and do not produce the same expression. But then I have always supposed it to be my own fault — because I would not take the trouble of practising.”

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Pride and Prejudice, ch. 31 (1813)
    (Source)
 
Added on 4-Jan-24 | Last updated 4-Jan-24
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

Where other powers of entertainment are wanting, the true philosopher will derive benefit from such as are given.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Pride and Prejudice, ch. 42 (1813)
    (Source)
 
Added on 20-Dec-23 | Last updated 20-Dec-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

“If Mr. Darcy is neither by honour nor inclination confined to his cousin, why is not he to make another choice? And if I am that choice, why may not I accept him?”
“Because honour, decorum, prudence, nay, interest, forbid it. Yes, Miss Bennet, interest; for do not expect to be noticed by his family or friends, if you wilfully act against the inclinations of all. You will be censured, slighted, and despised, by everyone connected with him. Your alliance will be a disgrace; your name will never even be mentioned by any of us.”
“These are heavy misfortunes,” replied Elizabeth. “But the wife of Mr. Darcy must have such extraordinary sources of happiness necessarily attached to her situation, that she could, upon the whole, have no cause to repine.”

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Pride and Prejudice, ch. 56 [Elizabeth and Lady Catherine] (1813)
    (Source)
 
Added on 11-Jan-24 | Last updated 11-Jan-24
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbors and laugh at them in our turn?

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Pride and Prejudice, ch. 57 [Mr. Bennet] (1813)
    (Source)
 
Added on 2-Nov-23 | Last updated 2-Nov-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

Elizabeth, feeling all the more than common awkwardness and anxiety of his situation, now forced herself to speak; and immediately, though not very fluently, gave him to understand that her sentiments had undergone so material a change, since the period to which he alluded, as to make her receive with gratitude and pleasure his present assurances. The happiness which this reply produced, was such as he had probably never felt before; and he expressed himself on the occasion as sensibly and as warmly as a man violently in love can be supposed to do.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Pride and Prejudice, ch. 58 (1813)
    (Source)
 
Added on 17-Jan-24 | Last updated 17-Jan-24
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

I have been a selfish being all my life, in practice, though not in principle.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Pride and Prejudice, ch. 58 [Darcy] (1813)
    (Source)
 
Added on 1-Feb-04 | Last updated 31-Jan-24
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

They gave themselves up wholly to their sorrow, seeking increase of wretchedness in every reflection that could afford it, and resolved against ever admitting consolation in future.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Sense and Sensibility, ch. 1 (1811)
    (Source)
 
Added on 17-Aug-23 | Last updated 17-Aug-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

I am afraid that the pleasantness of an employment does not always evince its propriety.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Sense and Sensibility, ch. 13 [Elinor] (1811)
    (Source)
 
Added on 10-Aug-23 | Last updated 10-Aug-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

I never wish to offend, but I am so foolishly shy, that I often seem negligent, when I am only kept back by my natural awkwardness.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Sense and Sensibility, ch. 17 [Edward] (1811)
    (Source)
 
Added on 30-Aug-23 | Last updated 30-Aug-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

Where so many hours have been spent in convincing myself that I am right, is there not some reason to fear I may be wrong?

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Sense and Sensibility, ch. 31 [Col. Brandon] (1811)
    (Source)
 
Added on 1-Feb-04 | Last updated 23-Mar-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Austen, Jane

What dreadful hot weather we have! It keeps one in a continual state of inelegance.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Letter (18 Sep 1796)
 
Added on 28-Jun-10 | Last updated 24-Jun-10
Link to this post | No comments
More quotes by Austen, Jane

I do not want people to be very agreeable, as it saves me the trouble of liking them a great deal.

Jane Austen
Jane Austen (1775-1817) English author
Letter to her sister Cassandra (24 Dec 1798)
 
Added on 5-Apr-10 | Last updated 5-Apr-10
Link to this post | No comments
More quotes by Austen, Jane