Quotations about:
    sorrow


Note not all quotations have been tagged, so Search may find additional quotes on this topic.


Here lamentation, groans, and wailings deep
     Reverberated through the starless air,
     So that it made me at the beginning weep.
Uncouth tongues, horrible chatterings of despair,
     Shrill and faint cries, words of grief, tones of rage,
     And with it all, smiting of hands, were there,
Making a tumult nothing could assuage,
     To swirl in the air that knows not day or night,
     Like sand within the whirlwind’s eddying cage.

[Quivi sospiri, pianti e alti guai
     risonavan per l’aere sanza stelle,
     per ch’io al cominciar ne lagrimai.
Diverse lingue, orribili favelle,
     parole di dolore, accenti d’ira,
     voci alte e fioche, e suon di man con elle
facevano un tumolto, il qual s’aggira
     sempre in quell’aura sanza tempo tinta,
     come la rena quando turbo spira.]

Dante Alighieri the poet
Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) Italian poet
The Divine Comedy [Divina Commedia], Book 1 “Inferno,” Canto 3, l. 22ff (3.22-30) (1320) [tr. Binyon (1943)]
    (Source)

Not even in Hell itself, but its antechamber, these are the sounds of those eternally rejected by both Heaven and Hell for standing neutral and not committing to either side. (Source (Italian)). Alternate translations:

There Sighs, and Cries, and horrid Howlings mix'd
With Shrieks, re-echo'd through the starless air,
Which frequent tears of pity from me drew.
Variety of tongues, reproaching Taunts,
Words grief expressing, Accents full of ire,
Voices both loud and hoarse, and clapping Hands
Rais'd in that dusky air a tumult wild,
Like to the sand when by a whirlwind toss'd.
[tr. Rogers (1782), l. 20ff]

Thence, Oh! what wailings from the abject throng
Around the starless sky incessant rung;
     The short, shrill shriek, and long resounding groan,
The thick sob, panting thro' the cheerless air,
The lamentagle strain of sad despair,
     And blasphemy, with fierce relentless tone.

Volleying around, the full, infernal choir,
Barbarian tongues, and plaints, and words of ire,
     (With oft' between the harsh inflicted blow)
In loud discordance from the tribes forlorn
Tumultuous rose, as in a whirlwind borne,
     With execrations mix'd, and murmurs low.
[tr. Boyd (1802), st. 6-7]

Here sighs with lamentations and loud moans
Resounded through the air pierc'd by no star,
That e'en I wept at entering. Various tongues,
Horrible languages, outcries of woe,
Accents of anger, voices deep and hoarse,
With hands together smote that swell'd the sounds,
Made up a tumult, that for ever whirls
Round through that air with solid darkness stain'd,
Like to the sand that in the whirlwind flies.
[tr. Cary (1814)]

Sighs there, and moaning sobs, and shriller cries
     Rebounded echoing through the starless air.
     And early forced the tear-gush from mine eyes:
Tongues of all strain, dread language of despair.
     Words born of anguish, accents choked with ire,
     And voices loud and hoarse were mingling there
With sound of hands, to swell one uproar dire
     That aye went eddying round that timeless gloom.
     As the sand eddieth in the whirlwind's gyre.
[tr. Dayman (1843)]

     Here sighs, plaints, and deep wailings sounded through the starless air: it made me weep at first.
     Strange tongues, horrible outcries, words of pain, tones of anger, voices deep and hoarse, and the sounds of hands amongst them,
     made a tumult, which turns itself unceasing in that air for ever dyed, as sand when [it eddies in a whirlwind].
[tr. Carlyle (1849)]

And then the sighs, complaints, and loud, loud groans
     Resounding through the air without a star,
     Began to wring my heart with many a tear.
Diverse the tongues and language horrible,
     The words of sorrow and accents of ire --
     High and weak voices -- sound of smiting there
A tumult made, that seemed t' encompass all
     Within that air, which colourless expands
     For aye, as when the whirlwinds raise the sands.
[tr. Bannerman (1850)]

Here sighs and moans and wailings terrible
     Resounded through the dim and starless air;
     Ev'n at the first my tears might not be stay'd.
Tongues divedrse, foul and horrible discourse,
     Utterings of grief and accents of deep rage,
     Words loud and hoarse, the sound of raging hands
Fierce tumult made, which sweeps with ceaseless roll
     In the deep darkness of that timeless air,
     As the sand rushes where the whirlwind blow.
[tr. Johnston (1867)]

There sighs, complaints, and ululations loud
     Resounded through the air without a star,
     Whence I, at the beginning, wept thereat.
Languages diverse, horrible dialects, ⁠
     Accents of anger, words of agony,
     And voices high and hoarse, with sound of hands,
Made up a tumult that goes whirling on
     Forever in that air forever black,
     Even as the sand doth, when the whirlwind breathes.
[tr. Longfellow (1867)]

There sighs, lamentations, and loud wailings were resounding through the starless air; wherefore I at the beginning wept for them. Divers languages, horrible speech, words of woe, accents of rage, voices loud and faint, and sounds of hands with them, made a tumult, which ever in that air eternally tinted circles as the sand when it is blowing up for a whirlwind.
[tr. Butler (1885)]

There sighings, and complaints, and wailings deep,
     Resounded ever in the starless air,
     so that at first I could not help but weep.
Different tongues, speech horrible to hear,
     Accents of anger and the words of pain,
     Voices both high and low, hand-clappings there,
Made up a tumult which aye whirls amain
     Through the thick air, eternally obscure,
     Like sand storm-driven o'er the desert plane.
[tr. Minchin (1885)]

Here sighs, laments, and deep wailings were resounding though the starless air; wherefore at first I wept thereat. Strange tongues, horrible cries, words of woe, accents of anger, voices high and hoarse, and sounds of hands with them, were making a tumult which whirls forever in that air dark without change, like the sand when the whirlwind breathes.
[tr. Norton (1892)]

Here sighs and lamentations and loud cries resounded through the starless air, wherefore at the first I wept to hear them. Tongues of many nations, utterings of horror, words of tribulation, tones of anger, voices loud and hoarse, and amongst them the sounds of hands, made an uproar that circleth unceasingly in that ever darksome air, even as the sand when the hurricane bloweth.
[tr. Sullivan (1893)]

Here sighs and lamentations and shrill wailings
     Resounded through the air by stars unlighted;
     Wherefore I wept thereat, e'en at the outset.
Horrible jargons, tongues of divers peoples,
     Accents of anger, words of bitter sorrow,
     Shrill and faint voices, sounds of hands among them,
Made a tumultuous uproar, that for ever
     Eddies athwart that air's eternal blackness,
     As sand when there is blast of coming whirlwind.
[tr. Griffith (1908)]

There sighs, lamentations and loud wailings resounded through the starless air, so that at first it made me weep; strange tongues, horrible language, words of pain, tones of anger, voices loud and hoarse, and with these the sound of hands, madea tumult which is whirling always through that air forever dark, as sand eddies in a whirlwind.
[tr. Sinclair (1939)]

Here sighing, and here crying, and loud railing
     Smote on the starles air, with lamentation,
     So that at first I wept to hear such wailing.
Tongues mixed and mingled, horrible execration,
     Shrill shrieks, hoarse groans, fierce yells and hideous blether
     And clapping of hands thereto, without cessation
Made tumult through the timeless night, that hither
     And thither drives in dizzying circles sped,
     As whirlwind whips the spinning sands together.
[tr. Sayers (1949)]

Here sighs and cries and wails coiled and recoiled
     on the starless air, spilling my soul to tears.
     A confusion of tongues and monstrous accents toiled
in pain and anger. Voices hoarse and shrill
     and sounds of blows, all intermingled, raised
     tumult and pandemonium that still
whirls on the air forever dirty with it
     as if a whirlwind sucked at sand.
[tr. Ciardi (1954), ll. 22-29]

Here sighs, laments, and loud wailings were resounding through the starless air, so that at first they made me weep. Strange tongues, horrible outcries, utterances of woe, accents of anger, voices shrill and faint, and the beating of hands among them, were making a tumult that swirls unceasingly in that dark and timeless air, like sand when a whirlwind blows.
[tr. Singleton (1970)]

Here sighs and cries and shrieks of lamentation
     echoed through the starless air of Hell;
     at first these sounds resounding made me weep:
tongues confused, a language strained in anguish
     with cadences of anger, shrill outcries
     and raucous groans in time to slapping hands,
raising a whirling storm that turns itself
     forever through that air of endless black,
     like grains of sand swirling when a whirlwind blows.
[tr. Musa (1971)]

Here sighs and lamentations and loud cries
     were echoing across the starless air,
     so that, as soon as I set out, I wept.
Strange utterances, horrible pronouncements,
     accents of anger, words of suffering,
     and voices shrill and faint, and beating hands --
all went to make a tumult that will whirl
     forever through that turbid, timeless air,
     like sand that eddies when a whirlwind swirls.
[tr. Mandelbaum (1980)]

Here there were sighings and complaints and howlings,
     Resounding in the air under no stars;
     So that at first I found myself in tears.
A jumble of languages, deformities of speech,
     Words which were pain, with intonations of anger,
     Voices which were deep and hoarse, hands clapped together,
Made altogether a tumult, round and round,
     Unceasingly in that air in which all was colorless,
     Just as it might be in a perpetual sandstorm.
[tr. Sisson (1981)]

The sighs, groans, and laments at first were so loud,
     Resounding through starless air, I began to weep;
     Strange languages, horrible screams, words imbued
With rage or despair, cries as of troubled sleep
     Or of a tortured shrillness -- they rose in a coil
     Of tumult, along with noises like the slap
Of beating hands, all fused in a ceaseless flail
     That churms and frenzies that dark and timeless air
     Like sand in a whirlwind.
[tr. Pinsky (1994)]

     There sighs, weeping, loud wailing resounded through the starless air, for which at the outset I shed tears.
     Strange languages, horrible tongues, words of pain, accents of anger, voices loud and hoarse, and sounds of blows with them,
     made a tumult that turns forever in that air darkened without time, like the sand when a whirlwind blows.
[tr. Durling (1996)]

Here sighs, complaints, and deep groans, sounded through the starless air, so that it made me weep at first. Many tongues, a terrible crying, words of sadness, accents of anger, voices deep and hoarse, with sounds of hands amongst them, making a turbulence that turns forever, in that air, stained, eternally, like sand spiralling in a whirlwind.
[tr. Kline (2002)]

Sighing, sobbing, moans and plaintive wailing
     all echoed here through air where no star shone,
     and I, as this began, began to weep.
Discordant tongues, harsh accents of horror,
     tormented words, the twang of rage, strident
     voices, the sound, as well, of smacking hands,
together these all stirred a storm that swirled
     for ever in the darkened air where no time was
     as sand swept up in breathing spires of wind.
[tr. Kirkpatrick (2006)]

Now sighs, loud wailing, lamentation
     resounded through the starless air,
     so that I too began to weep.
Unfamiliar tongues, horrendous accents,
     words of suffering, cries of rage, voices
     loud and faint, the sound of slapping hands --
all these made a tumult, always whirling
     in that black and timeless air,
     as sand is swirled in a whirlwind.
[tr. Hollander/Hollander (2007)]

To that unknown place, where shrieks and desperate sighs,
     Weeping, and fervent moaning filled the starless
     Air; I couild not keep myself from crying.
All sorts of tongues, a flood of horrible words,
     Much aching speech, with bursts of furious rage,
     Some loud, some weak, and hands that flapped like birds,
Blew in a swirling roar, forever created
     Anew, whirling around in that timeless air,
     Dark as pellets of sand in a hurricane.
[tr. Raffel (2010)]

Where sighs and moans and screams of ruined men,
Filling the air beneath the starless sky,
Resounding everywhere, ane everywhere
Was there inside me. I began to cry,
Stunned by the sound of an unseen nightmare.
Inhuman outcries in all human tongues,
Bad language, bursts of anger, yelps of pain,
Shrill scrambled messages from aching lungs,
And clapped hands, self-applause of the insane:
All this was whipped by its own energy
Into a timeless tumult without form --
Dark as a whirlpool in a dead black sea
Or a whirlwind sucking sand into a storm.
[tr. James (2013), l. 28ff]

 
Added on 28-Oct-22 | Last updated 28-Oct-22
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Dante Alighieri

Sweet is the remembrance of troubles when you are in safety.

Euripides (485?-406? BC) Greek tragic dramatist
Andromeda [Ἀνδρομέδα], Frag. 131 (TGF) (412 BC)
    (Source)

(Source (Greek)). Alternate translations:

'Tis sweet to recollect past toils in safety.
[tr. Wodhull (1809)]

Sweet is the memory of toils that are past.
[tr. Reid (1883), in Cicero, De Finibus, 2.105]

Sweet is the memory of sorrows past.
[tr. Rackham (1914), in Cicero, De Finibus, 2.105]

 
Added on 9-Aug-22 | Last updated 9-Aug-22
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Euripides

Can I see another’s woe,
And not be in sorrow too?
Can I see another’s grief,
And not seek for kind relief?

William Blake (1757-1827) English poet, mystic, artist
“On Another’s Sorrow,” st. 1, Songs of Innocence and of Experience (1789)
    (Source)
 
Added on 5-May-22 | Last updated 1-Jun-22
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , ,
More quotes by Blake, William

Everywhere, wrenching grief, everywhere, terror
and a thousand shapes of death.

[Crudelis ubique
Luctus, ubique pavor, et plurima mortis imago.]

Virgil (70-19 BC) Roman poet [b. Publius Vergilius Maro; also Vergil]
The Aeneid [Ænē̆is], Book 2, l. 368ff (2.368-369) (29-19 BC) [tr. Fagles (2006), ll. 461-462]
    (Source)

On the fighting in the streets of Troy. (Source (Latin)). Alternate translations:

All parts resound with tumults, plaints, and fears;
And grisly Death in sundry shapes appears.
[tr. Dryden (1697)]

Every where is cruel sorrow, every where terror and death in thousand shapes.
[tr. Davidson/Buckley (1854)]

Dire agonies, wild terrors swarm,
And Death glares grim in many a form.
[tr. Conington (1866)]

And everywhere are sounds of bitter grief,
And terror everywhere, and shapes of death.
[tr. Cranch (1872), l. 506-507]

Everywhere is cruel agony, everywhere terror, and the sight of death at every turn.
[tr. Mackail (1885)]

Grim grief on every side,
And fear on every side there is, and many-faced is death.
[tr. Morris (1900)]

All around
Wailings, and wild affright and shapes of death abound.
[tr. Taylor (1907), st. 49, l. 440-41]

Anguish and woe
were everywhere; pale terrors ranged abroad,
and multitudinous death met every eye.
[tr. Williams (1910)]

Everywhere sorrow,
Everywhere panic, everywhere the image
Of death, made manifold.
[tr. Humphries (1951)]

All over the town you saw
Heart-rending agony, panic, and every shape of death.
[tr. Day Lewis (1952)]

And everywhere
are fear, harsh grief, and many shapes of slaughter.
[tr. Mandelbaum (1971), l. 497-98]

Grief everywhere,
Everywhere terror, and all shapes of death.
[tr. Fitzgerald (1981)]

Bitter grief was everywhere. Everywhere there was fear, and death in many forms.
[tr. West (1990)]

Raw fear
Was everywhere, grief was everywhere,
Everywhere the many masks of death.
[tr. Lombardo (2005)]

All around were bitter grief and fear, and different scenes of death.
[tr. Bartsch (2021)]

 
Added on 30-Mar-22 | Last updated 30-Mar-22
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Virgil

I never will believe that our youngest days are our happiest. What a miserable augury for the progress of the race and the destination of the individual, if the more matured and enlightened state is the less happy one! Childhood is only the beautiful and happy time in contemplation and retrospect: to the child it is full of deep sorrows, the meaning of which is unknown.

George Eliot (1819-1880) English novelist [pseud. of Mary Ann Evans]
Letter to Sara Hennell (May 1844)
    (Source)
 
Added on 13-Oct-21 | Last updated 13-Oct-21
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Eliot, George

The wound hurts less than your desire to wound me.

James Richardson (b. 1950) American poet
“Vectors: 56 Aphorisms and Ten-second Essays,” Michigan Quarterly Review, # 18 (Spring 1999)
    (Source)
 
Added on 5-Oct-21 | Last updated 5-Oct-21
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Richardson, James

To lose a friend, a brother, or a son,
Heaven dooms each mortal, and its will is done:
Awhile they sorrow, then dismiss their care;
Fate gives the wound, and man is born to bear.

[μέλλει μέν πού τις καὶ φίλτερον ἄλλον ὀλέσσαι
ἠὲ κασίγνητον ὁμογάστριον ἠὲ καὶ υἱόν:
ἀλλ᾽ ἤτοι κλαύσας καὶ ὀδυράμενος μεθέηκε:
τλητὸν γὰρ Μοῖραι θυμὸν θέσαν ἀνθρώποισιν.]

Homer (fl. 7th-8th C. BC) Greek author
The Iliad [Ἰλιάς], Book 24, l. 46ff (24.46) [Apollo] (c. 750 BC) [tr. Pope (1715-20)]
    (Source)

Complaining of Achilles excessive grief over Patroclus. Original Greek. Alternate translations:

Other men a greater loss than he
Have undergone, a son, suppose, or brother of one womb;
Yet, after dues of woes and tears, they bury in his tomb
All their deplorings. Fates have giv’n to all that are true men
True manly patience.
[tr. Chapman (1611), l. 50ff]

For whosoever hath a loss sustain’d
Still dearer, whether of his brother born
From the same womb, or even of his son,
When he hath once bewail’d him, weeps no more,
For fate itself gives man a patient mind.
[tr. Cowper (1791), l. 59ff]

For perhaps some one will lose another more dear, either a brother, or a son; yet does he cease weeping and lamenting, for the Destinies have placed in men an enduring mind.
[tr. Buckley (1860)]

A man may lose his best-lov’d friend, a son,
Or his own mother’s son, a brother dear:
He mourns and weeps, but time his grief allays,
For fate to man a patient mind hath giv’n.
[tr. Derby (1864)]

It must be that many a man lose even some dearer one than was this, a brother of the same womb born or perchance a son; yet bringeth he his wailing and lamentation to an end, for an enduring soul have the Fates given unto men.
[tr. Leaf/Lang/Myers (1891)]

A man may lose one far dearer than Achilles has lost -- a son, it may be, or a brother born from his own mother's womb; yet when he has mourned him and wept over him he will let him bide, for it takes much sorrow to kill a man.
[tr. Butler (1898)]

Lo, it may be that a man hath lost one dearer even than was this -- a brother, that the selfsame mother bare, or haply a son; yet verily when he hath wept and wailed for him he maketh an end; for an enduring soul have the Fates given unto men.
[tr. Murray (1924)]

For a man must some day lose one who was even closer than this; a brother from the same womb, or a son. And yet he weeps for him, and sorrows for him, and then it is over, for the Destinies put in mortal men the heart of endurance.
[tr. Lattimore (1951)]

A sane one may endure an even dearer loss: a blood-brother, a son; and yet, by heaven, having grieved and passed through mourning, he will let it go. The Fates have given patient hearts to men.
[tr. Fitzgerald (1974)]

No doubt some mortal has suffered a dearer loss than this,
a brother born in the same womb, or even a son ...
he grieves, he weeps, but then his tears are through.
The Fates have given mortals hearts that can endure.
[tr. Fagles (1990), l. 54ff]

There is no doubt that a man may have lost someone even dearer,
either a brother by one same mother or even his own son,
yet once he has lamented and wept, he ceases to mourn him,
since mankind is endowed by the Fates with a heart of endurance.
[tr. Merrill (2007), l. 46ff]
 
Added on 10-Mar-21 | Last updated 1-Dec-21
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Homer

To care passionately for another human creature brings always more sorrow than joy; but all the same … one would not be without that experience. Anyone who has never really loved has never really lived.

Agatha Christie (1890-1976) English writer
Sad Cypress, ch. 2 (1940)
    (Source)
 
Added on 16-Dec-20 | Last updated 16-Dec-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Christie, Agatha

But if I am to die before my time, I count that a gain. When anyone lives as I do, surrounded by evils, how can he not carry off gain by dying?

[εἰ δὲ τοῦ χρόνου
πρόσθεν θανοῦμαι, κέρδος αὔτ᾽ ἐγὼ λέγω.
ὅστις γὰρ ἐν πολλοῖσιν ὡς ἐγὼ κακοῖς
ζῇ, πῶς ὅδ᾽ Οὐχὶ κατθανὼν κέρδος φέρει]

Sophocles (496-406 BC) Greek tragic playwright
Antigone, l. 460 ff [Antigone] (441 BC) [tr. Jebb (1891)]
    (Source)

Alt. trans.:

But if I am to die before my time, I count that a gain: for when any one lives, as I do, compassed about with evils, can such an one find aught but gain in death?
[tr. Jebb (1917)]

And if my time is shortened, this to me
Is gain indeed. For whoso lives, as I live,
Beset with many sorrows, how does he
Not win by dying?
[tr. Donaldson (1848)]

If death
Is thereby hastened, I shall count it gain
For death is gain to him whose life, like mine,
Is full of misery.
[tr. Storr (1859)]

And now, if I fall
A little sooner, 'tis the thing I wish.
To thou, who live in misery like me,
Believe me, King, 'tis happiness to die.
[tr. Werner (1892)]

But if I die young, all the better:
People who live in misery like mine
Are better dead.
[tr. Woodruff (2001)]

I knew that my death was imminent, of course I did, and even if it came sooner, I would still think it a good thing because when one lives in such a dreadful misery why should he not think death to be a good thing?
[tr. Theodoridis (2004)]

And if I have to die
before my time, well, I count that a gain.
When someone has to live the way I do,
surrounded by so many evil things,
how can she fail to find a benefit
in death?
[tr. Johnston (2005), l. 521ff]

If I die
before my time, I say it is a gain.
Who lives in sorrows many as are mine
how shall he not be glad to gain his death?
[tr. Wyckoff]

But if
I shall die before my time, I declare it a profit,
for whoever lives beset, as I do, by many things evil,
how does he not gain profit by dying?
[tr. Tyrrell/Bennett]
 
Added on 13-Nov-20 | Last updated 9-May-21
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Sophocles

What a strange machine man is! You fill him with bread, wine, fish, and radishes, and out comes sighs, laughter, and dreams.

Nikos Kazantzakis (1883-1957) Greek writer and philosopher
Zorba the Greek, ch. 23 (1946)
 
Added on 9-Nov-20 | Last updated 9-Nov-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Kazantzakis, Nikos

The joy of love is too short, and the sorrow thereof, and what cometh thereof, dureth over long.

No picture available
Thomas Malory (c. 1415-1471) English writer
Le Morte d’Arthur, Book 10, ch. 56 (1485)
    (Source)
 
Added on 29-Sep-20 | Last updated 29-Sep-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Malory, Thomas

There’s enough sorrow in the world, isn’t there, without trying to invent it.

E. M. Forster (1879-1970) English novelist, essayist, critic, librettist [Edward Morgan Forster]
A Room with a View, ch 2 (1908)
    (Source)
 
Added on 4-Apr-18 | Last updated 4-Apr-18
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , ,
More quotes by Forster, E. M.

Sorrow makes us all children again, destroys all difference of intellect. The wisest knows nothing.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) American essayist, lecturer, poet
Journal (30 Jan 1842)
    (Source)

Two days after he recorded the death of his son.
 
Added on 3-Apr-18 | Last updated 7-Jan-19
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Emerson, Ralph Waldo

Sorrow is how we learn to love. Your heart isn’t breaking. It hurts because it’s getting larger. The larger it gets, the more love it holds.

Rita Mae Brown (b. 1944) American author, playwright
Riding Shotgun, ch. 17 (1996)
    (Source)
 
Added on 26-Feb-18 | Last updated 26-Feb-18
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Brown, Rita Mae

He that lacks time to mourn, lacks time to mend.
Eternity mourns that. ‘Tis an ill cure
For life’s worst ills, to have no time to feel them.
Where sorrow’s held intrusive and turned out,
There wisdom will not enter, nor true power,
Nor aught that dignifies humanity.

Henry Taylor (1800-1886) English dramatist, poet, bureaucrat, man of letters
Philip Van Artevelde, Part 1, Act 1, sc. 5 (1834)
    (Source)
 
Added on 10-Oct-17 | Last updated 10-Oct-17
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Taylor, Henry

Don’t agonize, organize.

Florynce "Flo" Kennedy (1916-2000) American lawyer, feminist, civil rights activist
(Attributed)
    (Source)

Quoted in Gloria Steinem, "The Verbal Karate of Florynce R. Kennedy, Esq.," Ms. (Mar 1973).
 
Added on 10-Jul-17 | Last updated 10-Jul-17
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Kennedy, Florynce

It’s so hard to forget pain, but it’s even harder to remember sweetness. We have no scar to show for happiness. We learn so little from peace.

Chuck Palahniuk (b. 1962) American novelist and freelance journalist
Diary (2003)
 
Added on 29-May-17 | Last updated 29-May-17
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Palahniuk, Chuck

Proud people breed sad sorrows for themselves.

bronte-proud-people-sad-sorrows-wist_info-quote

Emily Brontë (1818-1848) British novelist, poet [pseud. Ellis Bell]
Wuthering Heights, ch. 7 (1847) [Nelly Dean]
    (Source)
 
Added on 8-Dec-16 | Last updated 8-Dec-16
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Bronte, Emily

There is not so much Comfort in the having of Children as there is Sorrow in parting with them.

Thomas Fuller (1654-1734) English writer, physician
Gnomologia: Adages and Proverbs, #4932 (1732)
    (Source)
 
Added on 4-Oct-16 | Last updated 26-Jan-21
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Fuller, Thomas (1654)

What happens to all the tears we do not shed?

renard-all-the-tears-we-do-not-shed-wist_info-quote

Jules Renard (1864-1910) French writer
Journal (Nov 1906) [tr. Bogan & Roget (1964)]
 
Added on 3-Oct-16 | Last updated 3-Oct-16
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Renard, Jules

Lofty mountains are full of springs; great hearts are full of tears.

Joseph Roux
Joseph Roux (1834-1886) French Catholic priest
Meditations of a Parish Priest, 5.56 [tr. Hapgood (1886)]
 
Added on 30-Sep-16 | Last updated 30-Sep-16
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Roux, Joseph

We choose our joys and our sorrows long before we experience them.

Kahlil Gibran (1883-1931) Lebanese-American poet, writer, painter [Gibran Khalil Gibran]
Sand and Foam (1926)
 
Added on 26-Sep-16 | Last updated 26-Sep-16
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Gibran, Kahlil

Cares are often more difficult to throw off than sorrows; the latter die with time, the former grow upon it.

Jean Paul Richter (1763-1825) German novelist, art historian, aesthetician [Johann Paul Friedrich Richter; pseud. Jean Paul]
(Attributed)
    (Source)

In Ballou, Treasury of Thought (1884).
 
Added on 17-Dec-15 | Last updated 17-Dec-15
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Richter, Jean-Paul

Moderate lamentation is the right of the dead,
excessive grief the enemy to the living.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) English dramatist and poet
All’s Well That Ends Well, Act 1, sc. 1, l. 57ff [Lafew] (1602?)
    (Source)
 
Added on 26-Oct-15 | Last updated 27-Jun-22
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Shakespeare, William

Grief is itself a med’cine.

William Cowper (1731-1800) English poet
“Charity,” l. 159 (1782)
 
Added on 19-Oct-15 | Last updated 19-Oct-15
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , ,
More quotes by Cowper, William

Even at the movies, we laugh together, we weep alone.

James Richardson (b. 1950) American poet
Vectors: Aphorisms and Ten-Second Essays (2001)
 
Added on 25-Sep-15 | Last updated 25-Sep-15
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Richardson, James

But we live through the fine days without noticing them; only when we fall on evil ones do we wish to have back the former. With sour faces we let a thousand bright and pleasant hours slip by unenjoyed and afterwards vainly sigh for their return when times are trying and depressing. Instead of this, we should cherish every present moment that is bearable, even the most ordinary, which with such indifference we now let slip by, and even with impatience push on.

[Aber wir verleben unsre schönen Tage, ohne sie zu bemerken: erst wann die schlimmen kommen, wünschen wir jene zurück. Tausend heitere, angenehme Stunden lassen wir, mit verdrießlichem Gesicht, ungenossen an uns vorüberziehn, um nachher, zur trüben Zeit, mit vergeblicher Sehnsucht ihnen nachzuseufzen. Statt dessen sollten wir jede erträgliche Gegenwart, auch die alltägliche, welche wir jetzt so gleichgültig vorüberziehn lassen, und wohl gar noch ungeduldig nachschieben.]

Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860) German philosopher
Parerga and Paralipomena, Vol. 1, “Aphorisms on the Wisdom of Life [Aphorismen zur Lebensweisheit],” ch. 5 “Counsels and Maxims [Paränesen und Maximen],” § 2.5 (1851) [tr. Payne (1974)]
    (Source)

(Source (German)). Alternate translation:

But we live through our days of happiness without noticing them; it is only when evil comes upon us that we wish them back. A thousand gay and pleasant hours are wasted in ill-humor; we let them slip by unenjoyed, and sigh for them in vain when the sky is overcast. Those present moments that are bearable, be they never so trite and common, -- passed by in indifference, or, it may be, impatiently pushed away.
[tr. Saunders (1890)]

 
Added on 3-Nov-14 | Last updated 28-Dec-22
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Schopenhauer, Arthur

Sorrow is a kind of rust of the soul, which every new idea contributes in its passage to scour away. It is the putrefaction of stagnant life, and is remedied by exercise and motion.

Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) English writer, lexicographer, critic
The Rambler, #47 (28 Aug 1750)
    (Source)
 
Added on 18-Jul-14 | Last updated 26-Jun-22
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , ,
More quotes by Johnson, Samuel

There is no wisdom in useless and hopeless sorrow, but there is something in it so like virtue, that he who is wholly without it cannot be loved.

Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) English writer, lexicographer, critic
Letter to Hester Thrale (12 Apr 1781)
 
Added on 16-May-14 | Last updated 16-May-14
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , ,
More quotes by Johnson, Samuel

When sorrows come, they come not single spies,
But in battalions.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) English dramatist and poet
Hamlet, Act 4, sc. 5, l. 84ff [Claudius] (c. 1600)
    (Source)
 
Added on 15-Apr-14 | Last updated 27-Jun-22
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Shakespeare, William

Patience is the cure for every sorrow.

Publilius Syrus (d. 42 BC) Assyrian slave, writer, philosopher [less correctly Publius Syrus]
Sententiae [Moral Sayings], # 170 [tr. Lyman (1862)]
 
Added on 8-Apr-14 | Last updated 15-Feb-17
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Publilius Syrus

Who never ate his bread in sorrow,
Who never spent the darksome hours
Weeping and watching for the morrow,
He knows ye not, ye gloomy Powers.

To earth, this weary earth, ye bring us,
To guilt ye let us heedless go,
Then leave repentance fierce to wring us:
A moment’s guilt, an age of woe!

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) German poet, statesman, scientist
Wilhelm Meister’s Apprenticeship, 2.13 (1796) [tr. Carlyle (1824)]
    (Source)
 
Added on 1-Apr-14 | Last updated 1-Apr-14
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , ,
More quotes by Goethe, Johann von

Depend upon it if a man talks of his misfortunes there is something in them that is not disagreeable to him; for where there is nothing but pure misery there never is any recourse to the mention of it.

Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) English writer, lexicographer, critic
Comment (1780)
    (Source)

In Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson, ch. 51 "1780" (1791)
 
Added on 21-Mar-14 | Last updated 21-Mar-14
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Johnson, Samuel

Our anger and annoyance are more detrimental to us than the things themselves which anger or annoy us.

Marcus Aurelius (AD 121-180) Roman emperor (161-180), Stoic philosopher
Meditations, Book 11, #15 [tr. Staniforth (1964)]
    (Source)

Alternate translations:

How many things may and do oftentimes follow upon such fits of anger and grief; far more grievous in themselves, than those very things which we are so grieved or angry for.
[tr. Casaubon (1634)]

Consider that our anger and impatience often proves much more mischievous than the provocation could possibly have done.
[tr. Collier (1701), #18]

Consider how much more pain is brought on us by the anger and vexation caused by such acts than by the acts themselves, at which we are angry and vexed.
[tr. Long (1862)]

Consider that our anger and impatience often prove much more mischievous than the things about which we are angry or impatient.
[tr. Zimmern (1887)]

How much more grievous are what fits of anger and the consequent sorrows bring than the actual things are which produce in us those angry fits and sorrows.
[tr. Farquharson (1944)]

Anger and the sorrow it produces are far more harmful than the things that make us angry.
[tr. Needleman/Piazza (2008)]

 
Added on 15-Nov-13 | Last updated 30-Mar-21
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Marcus Aurelius

Usually when people are sad, they don’t do anything. They just cry over their condition. But when they get angry, they bring about a change.

Malcolm X (1925-1965) American revolutionary, religious leader [b. Malcolm Little]
Malcolm X Speaks, ch. 9 “With Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer” (1965)
 
Added on 1-Nov-13 | Last updated 1-Dec-16
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Malcolm X

It is said that our anxiety does not empty tomorrow of its sorrows, but only empties today of its strength.

Charles Spurgeon (1834-1892) British Baptist preacher, author [Charles Haddon (C.H.) Spurgeon]
The Salt-Cellars (1889)
    (Source)
 
Added on 27-Aug-13 | Last updated 1-Aug-18
Link to this post | 1 comment
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Spurgeon, Charles

Better the cottage where one is merry than the palace where one weeps.

(Other Authors and Sources)
Chinese proverb
 
Added on 15-Feb-12 | Last updated 11-Feb-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by ~Other

I hold it true, whate’er befall;
I feel it, when I sorrow most;
‘Tis better to have loved and lost
Than never to have loved at all.

Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809-1892) English poet
“In Memoriam A. H. H.” , Part 27, st. 4 (1849)

Arthur Henry Hallam was the fiancé of Tennyson's sister Emily. Hallam died suddenly in September 1833.
 
Added on 18-Dec-07 | Last updated 24-Nov-15
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Tennyson, Alfred, Lord

Fellowship in woe doth woe assuage.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) English dramatist and poet
“Lucrece,” l. 790 (1594)
    (Source)
 
Added on 12-May-04 | Last updated 29-Jun-22
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Shakespeare, William

Man is the only animal that laughs and weeps, for he is the only animal that is struck with the difference between what things are, and what they ought to be.

William Hazlitt (1778-1830) English writer
Lectures on the English Comic Writers, Lecture 1 “On Wit and Humour” (1819)
    (Source)

Sometimes altered to end "... and what they might have been."
 
Added on 1-Feb-04 | Last updated 16-Mar-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Hazlitt, William

 
Added on 1-Feb-04 | Last updated 16-Apr-21
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth

Speaking of Yen Hui, the Master said: “How sad — to watch him forge ahead so resolutely, and never see how far he could go.”

[子謂顏淵曰、惜乎、吾見其進也、未見其止也。]

Confucius (c. 551- c. 479 BC) Chinese philosopher, sage, politician [孔夫子 (Kǒng Fūzǐ, K'ung Fu-tzu, K'ung Fu Tse), 孔子 (Kǒngzǐ, Chungni), 孔丘 (Kǒng Qiū, K'ung Ch'iu)]
The Analects [論語, 论语, Lúnyǔ], Book 9, verse 21 (9.21) (6th C. BC – AD 3rd C.) [tr. Hinton (1998)]
    (Source)

Regarding his finest student, who died young. Probable origin of a phrase frequently attributed to Confucius: "It does not matter how slowly you go so long as you do not stop."

Earlier sources use Legge's numbering of 9.20, as noted. (Source (Chinese)). Alternate translations:

The Master said of Yen Yuan, "Alas! I saw his constant advance. I never saw him stop in his progress."
[tr. Legge (1861), 9.20]

"Alas for Hwúi! I saw him (ever) making progress. I never saw him stopping short."
[tr. Jennings (1895), 9.20]

Confucius remarked of the same disciple [Yen Hui]: "Alas! he is dead. I have observed his constant advance; I never saw him stop in his progress."
[tr. Ku Hung-Ming (1898), 9.20]

The Master, referring to Yen Yüan, said: "Alas! I ever saw him make progress, and never saw him stand still."
[tr. Soothill (1910), 9.20]

He described Yen Yuan: Alas, I see him advance, I never see him stop (take a position).
[tr. Pound (1933), 9.20]

The Master said of Yen Hui, Alas, I saw him go forward, but had no chance to see whither this progress would have led him in the end.
[tr. Waley (1938), 9.20]

The Master said of Yen Yūan, "I watched him making progress, but I did not see him realize his capacity to the full. What a pity!"
[tr. Lau (1979)]

The master said of Yan Hui: "Alas! I saw that he was making progress, but I never saw that he was stopping."
[tr. Dawson (1993)]

The Master said of Yan Hui: "Alas, I watched his progress, but did not see him reach the goal."
[tr. Leys (1997)]

The master, speaking of Yan Yuan, said: "Alas! I only saw him advance and never saw him stop."
[tr. Huang (1997)]

Confucius talked about Yuan Yan, said: "What regrettable it is! I just saw that he kept going ahead, and never saw that he got any stopping."
[tr. Cai/Yu (1998), #230]

The Master said about Yan Hui, "Such a pity! I only saw his progress; I never saw where he got to."
[tr. Ames/Rosemont (1998)]

The Master said of Yén Hwéi, Alas! I saw him start, but I did not see him finish.
[tr. Brooks/Brooks (1998)]

The Master said of Yan Hui, “Alas! I watched his advance, and never once saw him stop.”
[tr. Slingerland (2003)]

Speaking of Yan Yuan, the Master said, What a pity! I saw him move forward. I never saw him come to a stop.
[tr. Watson (2007)]

The Master, referring to Yan Hui, said, "It is a pity! I saw him moving forward but did not see him complete his journey."
[tr. Chin (2014)]

Confucius said of Yan Yuan, "Impressive indeed! I always see his progress and have never noticed his pause."
[tr. Li (2020)]

 
Added on 1-Feb-04 | Last updated 6-Dec-22
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Confucius

We cannot prevent the birds of sorrow from flying over our heads, but we can refuse to let them build their nests in our hair.

(Other Authors and Sources)
Chinese proverb
 
Added on 1-Feb-04 | Last updated 11-Feb-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , ,
More quotes by ~Other

Keep me from the wisdom which does not cry, the philosophy which does not laugh, and the greatness which does not bow before children.

Kahlil Gibran (1883-1931) Lebanese-American poet, writer, painter [Gibran Khalil Gibran]
Mirrors of the Soul (1965)
 
Added on 1-Feb-04 | Last updated 18-Oct-16
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Gibran, Kahlil

When the Egyptians were drowning in the Red Sea, the angels in heaven began to break forth in songs of jubilation, but the Holy One, blessed be He, silenced them: “My creatures are perishing — and ye are ready to sing!”

The Talmud (AD 200-500) Collection of Jewish rabbinical writings
(Unreferenced)

In Louis I. Newman, comp. The Talmudic Anthology, 103 (1945): "When the Egyptians were drowning, the angels wished to sing. But God said, 'My children are dying, and you would sing?'"
 
Added on 1-Feb-04 | Last updated 17-Sep-15
Link to this post | 1 comment
Topics: , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Talmud

From silly devotions and sad-faced saints, O Lord, deliver me.

Teresa of Ávila (1515-1582) Spanish mystic, poet, philosopher, saint
(Attributed)

Variant: "God, deliver me from sullen saints."
 
Added on 1-Feb-04 | Last updated 28-Oct-15
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Teresa of Avila

Give sorrow words; the grief that does not speak
Whispers the o’er-fraught heart and bids it break.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) English dramatist and poet
Macbeth, Act 4, sc. 3, l. 246ff [Malcolm] (1606)
    (Source)
 
Added on 1-Feb-04 | Last updated 29-Jun-22
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Shakespeare, William

Grief makes one hour ten.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) English dramatist and poet
Richard II, Act 1, sc. 2, l. 267 [Bolingbroke] (1595)
    (Source)
 
Added on 1-Feb-04 | Last updated 29-Jun-22
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Shakespeare, William

And if I laugh at any mortal thing,
‘Tis that I may not weep.

George Gordon, Lord Byron (1788-1824) English poet
Don Juan, Canto 4, st. 4 (1820)
    (Source)
 
Added on 1-Feb-04 | Last updated 12-Jan-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Byron, George Gordon, Lord