Quotations by Browne, Thomas


Be able to be alone. Lose not the advantage of Solitude, and the Society of thy self, nor be only content, but delight to be alone and single with Omnipresency.

Thomas Browne (1605-1682) English physician and author
Christian Morals, Part 3, sec. 9 (1716)
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Added on 30-May-17 | Last updated 30-May-17
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The created world is but a small parenthesis in eternity.

Thomas Browne (1605-1682) English physician and author
Christian Morals, Part III (1716)
Added on 1-Feb-04 | Last updated 1-Feb-04
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Darkness and light divide the course of time, and oblivion shares with memory a great part even of our living beings; we slightly remember our felicities, and the smartest strokes of affliction leave but short smart upon us. Sense endureth no extremities and sorrows destroy us or themselves. To weep into Stones are fables. Afflictions induce callousities, miseries are slippery, or fall like Snow upon us, which notwithstanding is no unhappy stupidity. To be ignorant of evils to come, and forgetful of evils past, is a merciful provision in nature, whereby we digest the mixture of our few and evil days, and our delivered senses not relapsing into cutting remembrances, our sorrows are not kept raw by the edge of repetitions.

Thomas Browne (1605-1682) English physician and author
Hydriotaphia, or Urne-Buriall, ch. 5 (1658)
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Added on 29-May-17 | Last updated 29-May-17
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The religion of one seems madness unto another.

Thomas Browne (1605-1682) English physician and author
Hydriotaphia: Urn Burial, ch. 4 (1668) [ed. Symonds (1886)]
Added on 7-Mar-14 | Last updated 7-Mar-14
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Yet is every man his own greatest enemy, and as it were his own executioner.

Thomas Browne (1605-1682) English physician and author
Religio Medici, II.4 (1643)
Added on 10-Sep-07 | Last updated 10-Sep-07
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Obstinacy in a bad cause is but constancy in a good.

Thomas Browne (1605-1682) English physician and author
Religio Medici, pt. 1, sec. 25 (1643).
Added on 25-Oct-07 | Last updated 25-Oct-07
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All things are artificial, for nature is the art of God.

Thomas Browne (1605-1682) English physician and author
Religio Medici, 1.16 (1642) [ed. Symonds (1886)]
Added on 18-Sep-15 | Last updated 18-Sep-15
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Obstinacy in a bad cause is but consistency in a good.

Thomas Browne (1605-1682) English physician and author
Religio Medici, 1.25 (1642) [ed. Symonds (1886)]
Added on 18-May-16 | Last updated 18-May-16
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This is also a miracle; not to produce effects against or above nature, but before nature; and to create nature, as great a miracle as to contradict or transcend her. We do too narrowly define the power of God, restraining it to our capacities.

Thomas Browne (1605-1682) English physician and author
Religio Medici, 1.26 (1642) [ed. Symonds (1886)]
Added on 26-Sep-11 | Last updated 26-Sep-11
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I can hardly think there was ever any scared into Heaven; they go the fairest way to Heaven that would serve God without a Hell.

Thomas Browne (1605-1682) English physician and author
Religio Medici, I.52 (1643)
Added on 1-Feb-04 | Last updated 1-Feb-04
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I desire to exercise my faith in the most difficult point, for to credit ordinary and visible objects is not faith, but persuasion. Some believe the better for seeing Christ’s Sepulchre, and when they have seen the Red Sea, doubt not the miracle. Now contrarily I bless myself, and am thankful that I lived not in the days of miracles, that I never saw Christ nor His Disciples; I would not have been one of those Israelites that passed the Red Sea, nor one of Christ’s patients, on whom He wrought His wonders; then had my faith been thrust upon me, nor should I enjoy that greater blessing pronounced to all that believe and saw not.

Thomas Browne (1605-1682) English physician and author
Religio Medici, I.9 (1643)
Added on 1-Feb-04 | Last updated 1-Feb-04
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There is surely a piece of divinity in us, something that was before the elements, and owes no homage to the sun.

Thomas Browne (1605-1682) English physician and author
Religio Medici, II.11 (1643)
Added on 1-Feb-04 | Last updated 1-Feb-04
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No man can justly censure or condemn another, because indeed no man truly knows another.

Thomas Browne (1605-1682) English physician and author
Religio Medici, II.4 (1643)
Added on 1-Feb-04 | Last updated 1-Feb-04
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There is another man within me that’s angry with me.

Thomas Browne (1605-1682) English physician and author
Religio Medici, II.7 (1643)
Added on 1-Feb-04 | Last updated 1-Feb-04
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Persecution is a bad and indirect way to plant religion.

Thomas Browne (1605-1682) English physician and author
Religio Medici, pt. I, sec. 25 (1643)
Added on 4-Aug-08 | Last updated 4-Aug-08
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Man is a noble animal, splendid in ashes, and pompous in the grave, solemnizing nativities and deaths with equal luster, nor omitting ceremonies of bravery, in the infamy of his nature.

Thomas Browne (1605-1682) English physician and author
Urn-Burial: Or, Hydriotaphia, ch. 5 (1658)
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Added on 8-Jan-18 | Last updated 8-Jan-18
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But the iniquity of oblivion blindly scattereth her poppy, and deals with the memory of men without distinction to merit of perpetuity. … Who knows whether the best of men be known, or whether there be not more remarkable persons forgot than any that stand remembered in the known account of time.

Thomas Browne (1605-1682) English physician and author
Urn-Burial (1658)
Added on 1-Feb-04 | Last updated 1-Feb-04
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