Quotations by Heywood, John


Let the world slide, let the world go;
A fig for care, and a fig for woe!
If I can’t pay, why I can owe,
And death makes equal the high and low.

John Heywood (1497?-1580?) English playwright and epigrammist
“Be Merry Friends”
Added on 15-Aug-10 | Last updated 15-Aug-10
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Nought venture, nought have.

John Heywood (1497?-1580?) English playwright and epigrammist
A Dialogue Containing the Number of the Effectual Proverbs in the English Tongue, 1.11 (1562)

More commonly remembered, "Nothing ventured, nothing gained."
Added on 27-Apr-09 | Last updated 27-Apr-09
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Haste maketh waste.

John Heywood (1497?-1580?) English playwright and epigrammist
A Dialogue Containing the Number of the Effectual Proverbs in the English Tongue, 1.2 (1562)
Added on 24-Nov-10 | Last updated 24-Nov-10
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Who is so deafe, or so blynde, as is hee,
That wilfully will nother heare nor see?

[Who is so deaf, or so blind, as is he,
That willfully will neither hear nor see?]

John Heywood (1497?-1580?) English playwright and epigrammist
Dialogue of Proverbes, Part 2, ch. 9 (1546)
Added on 22-Jun-11 | Last updated 5-Jan-16
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By hooke or crooke.

John Heywood (1497?-1580?) English playwright and epigrammist
Proverbes, Part 1, ch. 11

The phrase most likely derives from English tenant rights to gather firewood "by hook or by crook" -- as much loose timber as could be pulled down from branches by a (shepherd's) crook, or cut with from underbrush by a  (pruning) billhook. The phrase first appears in the 14th Century.

Added on 27-Apr-11 | Last updated 27-Apr-11
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Every cocke is proud on his owne dunghill.

John Heywood (1497?-1580?) English playwright and epigrammist
Proverbes, Part 1, ch. 11
Added on 11-May-11 | Last updated 11-May-11
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It hurteth not the toung to give faire words.

John Heywood (1497?-1580?) English playwright and epigrammist
Proverbes, Part 1, ch. 9
Added on 4-May-11 | Last updated 4-May-11
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Enough is as good as a feast.

John Heywood (1497?-1580?) English playwright and epigrammist
Proverbes, Part 2, ch. 11
Added on 15-Jun-11 | Last updated 15-Jun-11
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Many hands make light warke.

John Heywood (1497?-1580?) English playwright and epigrammist
Proverbes, Part 2, ch. 5
Added on 25-May-11 | Last updated 25-May-11
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And while I at length debate and beat the bush,
There shall step in other men and catch the birds.

John Heywood (1497?-1580?) English playwright and epigrammist
Proverbs (1546)
Added on 1-Feb-04 | Last updated 1-Feb-04
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This hitteth the nail on the head.

John Heywood (1497?-1580?) English playwright and epigrammist
Proverbs (1546)
Added on 7-Oct-13 | Last updated 7-Oct-13
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Better one byrde in hand than ten in the wood.

John Heywood (1497?-1580?) English playwright and epigrammist
Proverbs, Part 1, ch. 2 (1546)
Added on 16-Feb-15 | Last updated 16-Feb-15
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When the sky falleth we shall have larks.

[When the skie falth we shall have Larkes.]

John Heywood (1497?-1580?) English playwright and epigrammist
Proverbs, Part 1, ch. 4 (1546)
Added on 23-Mar-11 | Last updated 23-Mar-11
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The nearer to the church, the further from God.

John Heywood (1497?-1580?) English playwright and epigrammist
Proverbs, Part 1, ch. 9 (1546)
Added on 6-Apr-11 | Last updated 6-Apr-11
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This hitteth the nail on the head.

John Heywood (1497?-1580?) English playwright and epigrammist
Proverbs, Part 2, ch. 11 (1546)
Added on 13-Apr-11 | Last updated 13-Apr-11
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Love me, love my dog.

John Heywood (1497?-1580?) English playwright and epigrammist
Proverbs, Part 2, ch. 9 (1546)

Earlier noted as a common proverb by Bernard of Clairvaux in the 11th Century: "Qui me amat, amet et canem meum [Who loves me will love my dog also] in Sermo Primus.
Added on 30-Mar-11 | Last updated 30-Mar-11
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Would ye both eat your cake, and have your cake?

John Heywood (1497?-1580?) English playwright and epigrammist
Proverbs, Part 2, ch. 9 (1546)
Added on 20-Apr-11 | Last updated 20-Apr-11
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