Quotations by Steele, Richard


A little in drink, but at all times yr faithful husband.

Richard Steele (1672-1729) Irish writer and politician
Letters to His Wife, 27 Sep 1708 (1707-1712)
Added on 7-May-13 | Last updated 7-May-13
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The married state, with and without the affection suitable to it, is the completest image of heaven and hell we are capable of receiving in this life.

Richard Steele (1672-1729) Irish writer and politician
Spectator, #479 (9 Sep 1712)
Added on 28-May-13 | Last updated 21-Nov-18
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Whenever you commend, add your reasons for doing so; it is this which distinguishes the approbation of a man of sense from the flattery of sycophants and admiration of fools.

Richard Steele (1672-1729) Irish writer and politician
The Guardian # 24 (8 Apr 1713)
Added on 10-Nov-14 | Last updated 10-Nov-14
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[I]t is a civil Cowardice to be backward in asserting what you ought to expect, as it is a military Fear to be slow in attacking when it is your Duty.

Richard Steele (1672-1729) Irish writer and politician
The Spectator, #2 (1711)
Added on 4-Jun-13 | Last updated 4-Jun-13
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Among all the diseases of the mind there is not one more epidemical or more pernicious than the love of flattery.

Richard Steele (1672-1729) Irish writer and politician
The Spectator, #238 (3 Dec 1711)
Added on 14-May-13 | Last updated 14-May-13
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It is a Secret known but to a few, yet of no small use in the Conduct of Life, that when you fall into a Man’s Conversation, the first thing you should consider is, whether he has a greater Inclination to hear you, or that you should hear him.

Richard Steele (1672-1729) Irish writer and politician
The Spectator, #49 (26 Apr 1711)
Added on 12-Jan-11 | Last updated 13-Jan-13
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No man was ever so completely skilled in the conduct of life, as not to receive new information from age and experience ….

Richard Steele (1672-1729) Irish writer and politician
The Spectator, #544 (24 Nov 1712)
Added on 21-May-13 | Last updated 21-May-13
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Methinks a Man cannot, without a secret Satisfaction, consider the Glory of the present Age, which will shine as bright as any other in the History of Mankind. It is still big with great Events, and has already produced Changes and Revolutions which will be as much admired by Posterity, as any that have happened in the Days of our Fathers, or in the old Times before them.

Richard Steele (1672-1729) Irish writer and politician
The Tatler, #130 (1710)
Added on 25-Jun-13 | Last updated 25-Jun-13
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Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body.

Richard Steele (1672-1729) Irish writer and politician
The Tatler, #147 (1710)
Added on 30-Apr-13 | Last updated 30-Apr-13
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It has often been a solid Grief to me, when I have reflected on this glorious Nation, which is the Scene of publick Happiness and Liberty, that there are still Crowds of private Tyrants, against whom there neither is any Law now in Being, nor can there be invented any by the Wit of Man. These cruel Men are ill-natured husbands.

Richard Steele (1672-1729) Irish writer and politician
The Tatler, #149 (1710)
Added on 11-Jun-13 | Last updated 11-Jun-13
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It’s a particular Observation I have always made, That of all Mortals, a Critick is the silliest; for by inuring himself to examine all Things, whether they are of Consequence or not, he never looks upon any Thing but with a Design of passing Sentence upon it; by which Means, he is never a Companion, but always a Censor.

Richard Steele (1672-1729) Irish writer and politician
The Tatler, #29 (1709)
Added on 23-Jul-13 | Last updated 15-Jul-13
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However low and poor the taking of Snuff argues a Man to be in his own Stock of Thought, or Means to employ his Brains and his Fingers, yet there is a poorer Creature in the World than He, and this is a Borrower of Snuff; a Fellow that keeps no Box of his own, but is always asking others for a Pinch.

Richard Steele (1672-1729) Irish writer and politician
The Tatler, #35 (1709)
Added on 9-Jul-13 | Last updated 9-Jul-13
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There is no Pleasure like that of receiving Praise from the Praiseworthy.

Richard Steele (1672-1729) Irish writer and politician
The Tatler, #89 (1709)
Added on 2-Jul-13 | Last updated 2-Jul-13
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