Quotations about:
    audience


Note not all quotations have been tagged, so Search may find additional quotes on this topic.


Contented, unambitious people are all very well in their way. They form a neat, useful background for great portraits to be painted against, and they make a respectable, if not particularly intelligent, audience for the active spirits of the age to play before.

Jerome K. Jerome (1859-1927) English writer, humorist [Jerome Klapka Jerome]
Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow, “On Getting On in the World” (1886)
    (Source)
 
Added on 29-Apr-24 | Last updated 29-Apr-24
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Jerome, Jerome K.

Mirth pleaseth some, to others ’tis offence,
Some commend plain conceit, some profound sense;
Some wish a witty Jest, some dislike that,
And most would have themselves they know not what.
Then he that would please all, and himself too,
Takes more in hand than he is like to do.

Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) American statesman, scientist, philosopher, aphorist
Poor Richard (1733)
    (Source)
 
Added on 18-Jul-23 | Last updated 18-Jul-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Franklin, Benjamin

Never try to convey your idea to the audience — it is a thankless and senseless task. Show them life, and they’ll find within themselves the means to assess and appreciate it.

Andrei Tarkovsky
Andrei Tarkovsky (1932-1986) Russian film director, screenwriter, film theorist [Андрей Арсеньевич Тарковский]
Sculpting in Time (1986) [tr. Hunter-Blair]
 
Added on 3-Oct-22 | Last updated 3-Oct-22
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Tarkovsky, Andrei

It is true that the poet does not directly address his neighbors; but he does address a great congress of persons who dwell at the back of his mind, a congress of all those who have taught him and whom he has admired; that constitute his ideal audience and his better self. To this congress the poet speaks not of peculiar and personal things, but of what in himself is most common, most anonymous, most fundamental, most true of all men. And he speaks not in private grunts and mutterings but in the public language of the dictionary, of literary tradition, and of the street. Writing poetry is talking to oneself; yet it is a mode of talking to oneself in which the self disappears; and the product’s something that, though it may not be for everybody, is about everybody.

Richard Wilbur
Richard Wilbur (1921-2017) American poet, literary translator
Acceptance Speech, National Book Award (1957)
 
Added on 29-Sep-22 | Last updated 29-Sep-22
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , ,
More quotes by Wilbur, Richard

In the verse Cinna writes
I am slandered, it’s said.
But the man doesn’t write
Whose verses aren’t read.

[Versiculos in me narratur scribere Cinna.
Non scribit, cuius carmina nemo legit.]

Marcus Valerius Martial
Martial (AD c.39-c.103) Spanish Roman poet, satirist, epigrammatist [Marcus Valerius Martialis]
Epigrams [Epigrammata], Book 3, epigram 9 (3.9) (AD 87-88) [tr. Nixon (1911)]

"On Cinna." (Source (Latin)). Alternate translations:

Cinna writes verses against me, 'tis said:
He writes not, whose bad verse no man doth read.
[tr. Fletcher (c. 1650)]

Against me Cinna, as I hear, indites;
Since none him reads, who can affirm he writes?
[tr. Killigrew (1695)]

Cinna's verse upon me, they say, keenly procedes.
He's beli'd: for he writes not, whom nobody reads.
[tr. Elphinston (1782). 12.23]

Jack writes severe lampoons on me, 'tis said
----But he writes nothing, who is never read.
[tr. Hodgson (c. 1810)]

Cinna, I am told, is a writer of small squibs against me. A man cannot be called a writer, whose effusions no one reads.
[tr. Bohn's Classical (1859)]

Cinna, they say, 'gainst me is writing verses:
He can't be said to write whom no one reads.
[ed. Harbottle (1897)]

Cinna is said to write verses against me. He doesn't write at all whose poems no man reads.
[tr. Ker (1919)]

He publishes lampoons on me, 'tis said;
How can he publish who is never read?
[tr. Pott & Wright (1921)]

Cinna writes poems against me? He has no readers,
so how can they say that he's a writer?
[tr. Bovie (1970)]

Cinna is reported to write verses against me. Nobody writes, whose poems nobody reads.
[tr. Shackleton Bailey (1993)]

Cinna, a writer, attacks me with screeds.
But he's not a writer whom nobody reads.
[tr. Ericsson (1995)]

They say Cinna writes little poems about me.
He’s no writer, whose verse nobody reads.
[tr. Kline (2006), "A Silent Critic"]

His verse was meant to strike me low,
But since he wrote it -- who will know?
[tr. Wills (2007)]

I hear Cinna has written some verses against me.
A man is no writer
if his poems have no reader.
[tr. Kennelly (2008)]

Cinna, they say, writes verse attacking me.
He doesn’t write, whose verses none will see.
[tr. McLean (2014)]

They say Cinna is writing epigrams and I'm his target. He's not "writing" if no one's reading him.
[tr. Nisbet (2015)]

They say that Cinna slams
me in his epigrams.
A poem no one has heard
has really not occurred.
[tr. Juster (2016)]

Cinna attacks me, calls me dirt?
Let him. Who isn't read, can't hurt.
[tr. O'Connell]

 
Added on 28-Jan-22 | Last updated 27-Nov-23
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Martial

A painting in a museum probably hears more foolish remarks than anything else in the world .

[Ce qui entend le plus de bêtises dans le monde est peut-être un tableau de musée.]

Brothers Goncourt
The Brothers Goncourt - Edmond (1822-96) & Jules (1830-70), French writers [a.k.a. J.E. de Goncourt]
Idées et sensations (1866)
    (Source)

Often mis-cited to just Edmond. Alternate translations:
  • "A painting in a museum hears more ridiculous opinions than anything else in the world."
  • "What hears the most stupid remarks in the world is perhaps a painting in a museum." [Source]
  • "Perhaps what hears the most nonsense in the world is a museum painting." [Source]
 
Added on 28-Sep-21 | Last updated 28-Sep-21
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Goncourt, The Brothers

A boo is a lot louder than a cheer. If you have 10 people cheering and one person booing, all you hear is the booing.

Lance Armstrong (b. 1971) American road racing cyclist
In “King of the Hill,” Sports Illustrated (2 Aug 2002)
    (Source)
 
Added on 20-Sep-21 | Last updated 20-Sep-21
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Armstrong, Lance

I made up my mind long ago to follow one cardinal rule in all my writing — to be clear. I have given up all thought of writing poetically or symbolically or experimentally, or in any of the other modes that might (if I were good enough) get me a Pulitzer prize. I would write merely clearly and in this way establish a warm relationship between myself and my readers, and the professional critics — Well, they can do whatever they wish.

Isaac Asimov (1920-1992) Russian-American author, polymath, biochemist
Nemesis, “Author’s Note” (1989)
    (Source)
 
Added on 5-Aug-21 | Last updated 5-Aug-21
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Asimov, Isaac

The way you win as a creative person is to learn to love the work and not the applause.

Bob Dylan (b. 1941) American singer, songwriter
(Misattributed)

Attributed to Dylan, but it actually appears to be from an article by Brian Herzog, "Don't Write for Applause" (28 May 2015), which touched on Dylan.
 
Added on 20-Jul-21 | Last updated 20-Jul-21
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Dylan, Bob

Make sure you have finished speaking before your audience has finished listening.

Dorothy Sarnoff
Dorothy Sarnoff (1914-2008) American opera singer, actress, image consultant
Speech Can Change Your Life (1970)
    (Source)
 
Added on 15-Jul-21 | Last updated 15-Jul-21
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Sarnoff, Dorothy

Shynesss is I-ness. Shyness is really wondering if you have other people’s approval.

Dorothy Sarnoff
Dorothy Sarnoff (1914-2008) American opera singer, actress, image consultant
Never Be Nervous Again (1987)
    (Source)
 
Added on 1-Jul-21 | Last updated 1-Jul-21
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , ,
More quotes by Sarnoff, Dorothy

The essence of all art is to have pleasure in giving pleasure.

Mikhail Baryshnikov (b. 1948) Latvian-American dancer, choreographer, actor
“Baryshnikov: Gotta Dance,” Time (19 May 1975)
    (Source)
 
Added on 23-Jun-21 | Last updated 23-Jun-21
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Baryshnikov, Mikhail

Having a large audience does not, of course, prove that something is necessarily good. I subscribe to the theory that only a creation that speaks to succeeding generations can truly be labeled art.

Charles Schulz (1922-2000) American cartoonist
“My Life and Art with Charlie Brown and Others,” My Life with Charlie Brown (2010) [ed. Inge]
    (Source)
 
Added on 29-Mar-21 | Last updated 29-Mar-21
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Schulz, Charles

Humor is the most honest of emotions. Applause for a speech can be insincere, but with humor, if the audience doesn’t like it there’s no faking it.

Robert Orben (b. 1927) American comedy writer, magician, speechwriter
In “A Little Night Humor,” Washington Post (28 Jan 1982)
    (Source)
 
Added on 13-Nov-20 | Last updated 13-Nov-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Orben, Robert

The human brain starts working the moment you are born and never stops until you stand up to speak in public.

George Jessel (1898-1981) American comedian, singer, songwriter, producer
Quoted in The Observer (7 Aug 1949)

Jessel was a frequent master of ceremonies, and often used the line. Variant: "The human brain is a wonderful thing. It starts working the moment you are born, and never stops until you stand up to speak in public."
 
Added on 10-Jul-20 | Last updated 10-Jul-20
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Jessel, George

Everyone loves a witch hunt as long as it’s someone else’s witch being hunted.

Walter Kirn (b. 1962) American novelist, literary critic, essayist
Twitter (10 Jan 2011)
    (Source)
 
Added on 26-Aug-17 | Last updated 5-Sep-17
Link to this post | 2 comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Kirn, Walter

Acting is merely the art of keeping a large group of people from coughing.

Ralph Richardson (1902-1983) English actor
In The New York Herald Tribune (19 May 1946)
    (Source)
 
Added on 13-Jun-17 | Last updated 13-Jun-17
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Richardson, Ralph

All novels are, or should be, written for both men and women to read, and I am at loss to conceive how a man should permit himself to write anything that would be really disgraceful to a woman, or why a woman should be censured for writing anything that would be proper and becoming for a man.

Anne Brontë (1820-1849) British novelist, poet [pseud. Acton Bell]
The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, Preface (1848)
    (Source)
 
Added on 2-Feb-17 | Last updated 2-Feb-17
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Bronte, Anne

There are three difficulties in authorship: to write anything worth the publishing, to find honest men to publish it, and to get sensible men to read it.

Charles Caleb "C. C." Colton (1780-1832) English cleric, writer, aphorist
Lacon: or, Many Things in Few Words, Preface (1820)
    (Source)
 
Added on 14-Mar-16 | Last updated 14-Mar-16
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , ,
More quotes by Colton, Charles Caleb

Don’t consider how many you can please, but whom.

Publilius Syrus (d. 42 BC) Assyrian slave, writer, philosopher [less correctly Publius Syrus]
Sententiae [Moral Sayings], # 599 [tr. Lyman, Jr. (1862)]
 
Added on 28-Aug-15 | Last updated 20-Feb-17
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Publilius Syrus

To have great poets, there must be great audiences, too.

Walt Whitman (1819-1892) American poet
Specimen Days and Collect, “Ventures, on an Old Theme,” closing paragraph (1882)
 
Added on 22-Apr-15 | Last updated 22-Apr-15
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , ,
More quotes by Whitman, Walt

We ought in fairness to fight our case with no help beyond the bare facts: nothing, therefore, should matter except the proof of those facts. Still, as has been already said, other things affect the result considerably, owing to the defects of our hearers.

[δίκαιον γὰρ αὐτοῖς ἀγωνίζεσθαι τοῖς πράγμασιν, ὥστε τἆλλα ἔξω τοῦ ἀποδεῖξαι περίεργα ἐστίν: ἀλλ᾽ ὅμως μέγα δύναται, καθάπερ εἴρηται, διὰ τὴν τοῦ ἀκροατοῦ μοχθηρίαν.]

Aristotle (384-322 BC) Greek philosopher
Rhetoric [Ῥητορική; Ars Rhetorica], Book 3, ch. 1, sec. 5 (3.1.5) / 1404a (350 BC) [tr. Roberts (1924)]
    (Source)

On style vs. substance in shaping judgment. (Source (Greek)). Alternate translations:

For justice would be to contend with the facts only, so that every thing else beside the mere demonstration is superfluous; nevertheless, it [style] is of great influence, as has been said, owing to the corruption of the hearers.
[Source (1847)]

Our facts ought to be our sole weapons, making everything superfluous which is outside the proof; owing to the infirmities of the hearer, however, style, as we have said, can do much.
[tr. Jebb (1873)]

For justice should consist in fighting the case with the facts alone, so that everything else that is beside demonstration is superfluous; nevertheless, as we have just said, it [style] is of great importance owing to the corruption of the hearer.
[tr. Freese (1926)]

Although [...] in justice, litigants should appeal only to the facts to contest the case, so that everything apart from demonstration is superfluous, it remains the case, as I have aid, that, thanks to the audience's moral weakness, delivery is very effective.
[tr. Waterfield (2018)]

 
Added on 7-Feb-14 | Last updated 1-Feb-22
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , ,
More quotes by Aristotle

Can you appreciate music without playing it? Of course you can, in the same way that people who are not athletes get enjoyment from attending a game to enjoy the crowd, the excitement, and the experience.

Jascha Heifetz (1901-1987) Lithuanian-American violinist
(Unsourced)
 
Added on 9-Dec-13 | Last updated 9-Dec-13
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , ,
More quotes by Heifetz, Jascha

This is perhaps a not unimportant counsel to give to writers: write nothing that does not give you great pleasure; emotion passes easily from writer to reader.

[Ce ne serait peut-être pas un conseil peu important à donner aux écrivains, que celui-ci: n’écrivez jamais rien qui ne vous fasse un grand plaisir; l’émotion se propage aisément de l’écrivain au lecteur.]

Joseph Joubert (1754-1824) French moralist, philosopher, essayist, poet
Pensées [Thoughts], ch. 23 “Des Qualités de l’Écrivain [On the Qualities of Writers],” ¶ 58 (1850 ed.) [tr. Lyttelton (1899), ch. 22, ¶ 25]
    (Source)

(Source (French)). Alternate translations:

This were perhaps not an unimportant advice to give to writers: never write any thing that does not give you great enjoyment; emotion is easily propagated from the writer to the reader.
[tr. Calvert (1866), ch. 15]

And perhaps there is no advice to give a writer more important than this: -- Never write anything that does not give you great pleasure.
[tr. Auster (1983)], 1823 entry]

 
Added on 5-Aug-13 | Last updated 13-May-24
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , , , , , ,
More quotes by Joubert, Joseph

Whenever you are to do a thing tho’ it can never be known but to yourself, ask yourself how you would act were all the world looking at you, and act accordingly.

Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) American political philosopher, polymath, statesman, US President (1801-09)
Letter to Peter Carr (19 Aug 1785)
    (Source)
 
Added on 15-Oct-12 | Last updated 24-Jul-22
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Jefferson, Thomas

All charming people have something to conceal, usually their total dependence on the appreciation of others.

Cyril Connolly (1903-1974) English intellectual, literary critic and writer.
Enemies of Promise, ch. 16 (1938)
 
Added on 17-Oct-05 | Last updated 16-Aug-21
Link to this post | No comments
Topics: , , , ,
More quotes by Connolly, Cyril